Woody Guthrie Center

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The Bob Dylan Archive has been acquired by the George Kaiser Family Foundation (GKFF) and The University of Tulsa (TU) and will be permanently housed in Tulsa. The archive will be made available to scholars and curated for public exhibitions in the near future, under the stewardship of TU’s Helmerich Center for American Research.


Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders told an estimated crowd of 6,900 in Tulsa on Wednesday night that he is ready to "make history" on March 1 and win Oklahoma's primary.

"When I look out at this crowd, I don't think there's any way that we're gonna lose on Tuesday," Sanders said, to thunderous applause.

During the 50-minute speech, Sanders called for justice reform and investing in the American workforce. He spoke to another roughly 2,000 supporters who could not get into the Cox Business Center following the speech.

The Woody Guthrie Center became the first U.S. affiliate of the Los Angeles-based Grammy Museum Tuesday, which officials said will greatly expand the opportunities for both institutions. The Woody Guthrie Center joins the Bob Marley Museum in Kingston, Jamaica, which was announced as the first Grammy Museum affiliate in February. The Grammy Museum also has established partnerships with the University of Southern California and Oregon State University.

Woody Guthrie's relationship with his home state has always been complicated. The singer-songwriter left Oklahoma and traveled the nation, composing some of the best-known songs of his time and ours. But to many in the state, his progressive political views did not fit with a strong conservative streak during the Cold War period. His reputation there is now closer to a full restoration as Oklahoma opens his archives.