Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

Why City of Hugo Hasn’t Seen One Cent of Record Settlement Over Improperly Treated Drinking Water

Oklahoma’s primary environmental agency made a private contractor pay just under $1 million earlier in a settlement over improperly treated water in a small city in southern Oklahoma. But the state’s budget shortfall swallowed up the money before the city of Hugo had a chance to use it. By early 2015, the state Department of Environmental Quality had detected problems with the way UK-based Severn Trent was treating the water in Hugo. Later that year, a Journal Record report exposed the...
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WATCH: Herman Lookout On Revitalizing The Osage Language

Herman "Mogri" Lookout is the master language teacher for the Osage Nation in Pawhuska, Oklahoma. He's studied the language for forty years and helped revitalize the written portion of it by creating an orthography. Language teachers and experts from all over Native America say that an orthography is a way to reclaim your sovereignty. Lookout also worked with developers to create Osage for Unicode. Because of that, Osages all over the world can write and text in the language. He says...
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Headlines for Friday, July 29, 2016:

  • Oklahoma Democrats are returning home today energized by the National Convention in Philadelphia. (NewsOK)

  • An Oklahoma GOP Congressman says Trump would be better on foreign policy than Clinton. (Tulsa World)

Hillary Clinton accepted her party's nomination on Thursday, completing the field for an American political campaign without historical precedent.

Clinton, the first female presidential nominee for a major American party, has now officially become Republican Donald Trump's Democratic rival for the presidency of the United States.

Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma’s primary environmental agency made a private contractor pay just under $1 million earlier in a settlement over improperly treated water in a small city in southern Oklahoma. But the state’s budget shortfall swallowed up the money before the city of Hugo had a chance to use it.

AMK713 / FLICKR

Oklahoma remained No. 4 in the U.S. in installed wind power capacity during the second quarter of 2016, but a national industry group expects the state to move up the ranks by the end of the year.

No new wind farms have been completed in recent months, according to a report from the American Wind Energy Association, but more than 1,000 megawatts are currently under construction, The Oklahoman's Paul Monies reports:

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

State officials are considering what to do with $140.8 million dollars that was cut from state agencies in the middle of last fiscal year, but can now be spent. The money is available because General Revenue Fund reductions required by the FY 2016’s midyear revenue failure were deeper than necessary.

Governor Fallin said in a press release that she is considering using the money to fund teacher pay raises.

Headlines for Thursday, July 28, 2016:

  • Governor Fallin considers a special session to give teachers a pay raise. (NewsOK)

  • School athletic programs take hit amid state budget cuts. (Tulsa World)

  A new album from the Adventure Road provides a soundtrack for traveling across Oklahoma.

The Chickasaw Nation Tourism initiative launched an album of original songs last year, but musician Don Juntenen says this year he wanted to create an album of classic songs.

Democrats called on Americans to reject what they called the politics of fear and division of the GOP and elect Hillary Clinton during the third day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.

oksenate.gov

Family members say Oklahoma's first black state senator, who held a sit-in at the state Capitol with civil rights icon Clara Luper and fought to keep the state's only historically black university open, has died.

Sonya Porter says her father, E. Melvin Porter, died Tuesday at his Oklahoma City home after contracting a fever while in hospice care. He was 86.

Oklahoma Forestry Services says it's closing four offices and reducing services as part of a restructuring program forced by budget reductions.

Forestry Services Director George Geissler says the agency plans to reallocate resources to maximize its remaining services. While some services will no longer be available to landowners in western Oklahoma, all 77 Oklahoma counties will continue to receive wildfire suppression support.

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KOSU's Michael Cross talks about political news in Oklahoma with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican political consultant Neva Hill.

Education News

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

State officials are considering what to do with $140.8 million dollars that was cut from state agencies in the middle of last fiscal year, but can now be spent. The money is available because General Revenue Fund reductions required by the FY 2016’s midyear revenue failure were deeper than necessary.

Governor Fallin said in a press release that she is considering using the money to fund teacher pay raises.

The City of Edmond passed a resolution Monday night opposing a ballot initiative this fall that would raise Oklahoma’s sales tax by 1 percent to pay for education.

The tax hike would raise about $615 million per year for common and higher education in the state, but Edmond city leaders are worried it would hinder economic development. Oklahoma is the only state in the U.S. where cities and towns rely on local sales taxes as their primary source of revenue.

Emily Wendler / KOSU

After months of debate, the Oklahoma City Public School Board voted to expand KIPP Charter Schools at Monday night’s board meeting. But the expansion will not go as originally planned.

KIPP currently runs a middle school out of F.D. Moon Academy, and has been fighting to extend their rigorous academic model within the district. The charter school proposed starting an elementary school in Martin Luther King Jr. Elementary and hoped to share space with Douglass High School as well. However, Superintendent Aurora Lora says a task force will do more research to decide the locations.

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A weekly two-hour show of Oklahoma music, from across the state. The show opens a window of Oklahoma music to the rest of the world.

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