Claire Donnelly / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

Committee Recommends Oklahoma Continue Moratorium On Capital Punishment

A bipartisan group of Oklahomans is urging the state to keep its temporary ban on the death penalty. The independent group, the Oklahoma Death Penalty Review Commission, spent more than a year reviewing the state’s death penalty process, from the initial arrest and questioning of a suspect through the execution. “Many of the findings of the Commission’s year-long investigation were disturbing and led Commission members to question whether the death penalty can be administered in a way that...

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Robert Siegel Stepping Down As 'All Things Considered' Host In 2018

Robert Siegel, whose career with NPR has spanned more than four decades, will be stepping down as co-host of NPR's All Things Considered next year. One of the most distinctive voices on NPR's airwaves, Siegel will be leaving the host's chair in January 2018. He has hosted the show for 30 years. "This is a decision long in the making and not an easy one," Siegel said. "I've had the greatest job I can think of, working with the finest colleagues anyone could ask for, for as long a stretch as I...

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Those with ophidiophobia — that’s a fear of snakes — might want to steer clear of this next story. That’s because the town of Okeene, Oklahoma, holds its 78th annual rattlesnake roundup this week.

Headlines for Wednesday, April 26, 2017:

  • A bill seeking to increase the lottery’s contribution to education funding is heading to the Governor’s desk. (Tulsa World)

Claire Donnelly / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

A bipartisan group of Oklahomans is urging the state to keep its temporary ban on the death penalty.

The independent group, the Oklahoma Death Penalty Review Commission, spent more than a year reviewing the state’s death penalty process, from the initial arrest and questioning of a suspect through the execution.

Flickr / texasbackroads

A bill that seeks to increase the lottery's contribution to education funding is heading to the Governor Mary Fallin's desk.

By law, the Oklahoma lottery gives 35 percent of its profits to education. But officials from the Oklahoma Lottery Commission say this mandate is actually stifling the amount of money that goes to schools.

They say it limits their ability to award large cash prizes, and so a lot of people don't play.

The Cherokee Nation is suing top drug distributors and pharmacies — including Wal-Mart — alleging they profited greatly by "flooding" communities in Oklahoma with prescription painkillers, leading to the deaths of hundreds of tribal members.

Robert Siegel, whose career with NPR has spanned more than four decades, will be stepping down as co-host of NPR's All Things Considered next year.

One of the most distinctive voices on NPR's airwaves, Siegel will be leaving the host's chair in January 2018. He has hosted the show for 30 years.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Headlines for Tuesday, April 25, 2017:

  • Bad sports boosters could face lawsuits under a new law signed by Governor Fallin. (NewsOK)

  • The State House passes conflicting measures on justice reform. (NewsOK)

  • The state plans to look into the backlog of untested rape kits. (Tulsa World)

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahomans joined thousands of people in more than 600 cities on Saturday in a march for scientific freedom organized to send a message to state and national lawmakers.

Headlines for Monday, April 24, 2017:

  • A budget proposal to use bonds to shore up a shortfall is getting pushback. (Tulsa World)

  • The number of schools moving to four-day weeks doubles over the past year. (NewsOK)

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KOSU's Michael Cross talks about political news in Oklahoma with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican political consultant Neva Hill.

Stream classical music via our partners at KUCO!

Education News

Flickr / texasbackroads

A bill that seeks to increase the lottery's contribution to education funding is heading to the Governor Mary Fallin's desk.

By law, the Oklahoma lottery gives 35 percent of its profits to education. But officials from the Oklahoma Lottery Commission say this mandate is actually stifling the amount of money that goes to schools.

They say it limits their ability to award large cash prizes, and so a lot of people don't play.

Emily Wendler / KOSU

Superintendents across Oklahoma are begging lawmakers to do something about school funding. Ultimately, school officials want more money, but that requires raising taxes, which is a tough thing to do in Oklahoma—for many reasons. However, this year, solutions are popping up in unexpected places.

The Superintendent of Ponca City Public Schools, David Pennington, said if education funding is cut next year he is going to have to drastically change the way his school functions.  

Flickr / texasbackroads

The Senate passed a measure on Thursday that will overhaul Oklahoma's A through F School Report Card system.

For years, educators have called Oklahoma's A through F school report card flawed and unfair. They say the focus on student test scores is a bad way to measure a school’s performance.

Under House Bill 1693, the newly proposed system will focus more on student academic growth from year to year.

More Education News
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