weather

Health
5:36 am
Fri July 17, 2015

'When Thunder Roars, Go Indoors' To Best Avoid Lightning's Pain

You don't have to be outdoors to be hurt or injured by a nearby lightning strike, like this one in New Mexico. The pain for survivors can be lifelong.
Marko Korosec Barcroft Media/Landov

Originally published on Mon July 20, 2015 10:19 am

Lightning strikes have killed at least 20 people in the U.S. so far this year, according to the National Weather Service. That's higher than the average for recent years, the service says.

Most people who are injured or killed by lightning, it turns out, are not struck directly — instead, the bolt lands nearby.

That's what happened to Steve Marshburn in 1969. He was working inside a bank and says lightning somehow made its way through an ungrounded speaker at the drive-through window to the stool where he was sitting.

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Science
5:09 am
Fri July 17, 2015

Science Confirms 2014 Was Hottest Yet Recorded, On Land And Sea

Floodwaters from rising sea levels have submerged and killed trees in Bedono village in Demak, Central Java, Indonesia. As oceans warm, they expand and erode the shore. Residents of Java's coastal villages have been hit hard by rising sea levels in recent years.
Ulet Ifansasti Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 10:14 am

For the past quarter-century, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has been gathering data from more than 400 scientists around the world on climate trends.

The report on 2014 from these international researchers? On average, it was the hottest year ever — in the ocean, as well as on land.

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The Two-Way
7:07 am
Wed June 17, 2015

Storm Pours More Rain On Drenched Texas

A weather radar map shows the position of Tropical Depression Bill in Texas, as of Wednesday morning.
National Weather Service

Originally published on Wed June 17, 2015 8:46 am

Flood watches have been issued for areas of central and northern Texas, since Tropical Storm Bill came ashore and makes its way up the state. Rainfall of 4-8 inches is forecast in a band stretching from Texas up to Missouri, with some areas receiving up to 12 inches, according to the National Weather Service.

"These rains may produce life-threatening flash floods," the service's forecasters say.

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The Two-Way
7:57 am
Mon June 15, 2015

Texas Braces For Heavy Rain As Tropical Wave Gathers Steam In Gulf

This map shows the amount of rain expected in the U.S. over the next three days.
NOAA

Originally published on Mon June 15, 2015 4:45 pm

Parts of Texas have barely had time to recover from the last round of flooding rains, but the National Weather Service is warning that there's more to come this week.

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US News
2:21 pm
Mon June 8, 2015

This Past May Was Wettest Month On Record, Says NOAA

Tex Toler watches the Llano River rise Friday in Llano, Texas, after another round of heavy rains that have brought flooding and deaths to the state.
Jay Janner TNS /Landov

A lot of news came out of the torrential rains that fell across the United States in May.

Now, we have hard numbers that put that in perspective: According to NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information this past May was wettest month in 121 years of recorded history.

On average, the contiguous U.S. received 4.36 inches of rain. That's 1.45 inches above average and also the wettest May on record.

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All Tech Considered
5:01 am
Mon April 20, 2015

Social Media Can Help Track Tornadoes, But Was That Tweet Real?

Purdue University students are testing new software that may track and warn about tornadoes, such as this one which struck Rochelle, Ill., in early April.
Walker Ashley AP

Originally published on Mon April 20, 2015 7:49 am

Last week, as a big storm bore down on Rockford, Ill., students in a Purdue University classroom prepared to track its effects using Twitter.

Using software jointly developed by Purdue, the Department of Homeland Security and the National Weather Service, they huddled around laptops to analyze a tiny sample of the tweets from the storm's immediate vicinity. They were looking for keywords like "damage" or "tornado" and for pictures of funnel clouds.

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The Two-Way
11:17 am
Fri January 16, 2015

It's Official: 2014 Was The Hottest Year On Record, NOAA Says

January–December 2014 blended land and sea surface temperature anomalies in degrees Celsius.
NOAA

It's official: 2014 was the hottest year on record.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Climatic Data Center crunched the numbers and came to this conclusion:

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The Two-Way
6:38 am
Mon January 5, 2015

Oh, It's Winter: Huge Swath Of U.S. Will Be Bitterly Cold

A map showing the forecast low temperatures.
National Weather Service

Originally published on Mon January 5, 2015 8:25 am

Winter has arrived in the United States: Over the next day or so, the jet stream will dip and bring some bone-chilling temperatures to a huge swath of the country.

Meteorologists at the Weather Channel say the winter storm will "bring a swath of snow more than 2,000 miles long from the Cascades and Northern Rockies across the Midwest and into the Northeast through Tuesday."

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StateImpact Oklahoma
7:44 am
Thu May 15, 2014

Drought and Passive Landowners Add Fuel to Oklahoma’s Burning Red Cedar Problem

Billy Hays in the cab of a Bobcat, which Oklahoma County modified to cut and shred Eastern Red Cedars.
Credit Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

The eastern red cedar tree causes allergies, crowds out other species, guzzles water, and fuels Oklahoma’s most devastating wildfires, including one near Guthrie last week. And lengthy drought has intensified the problem. But as StateImpact’s Logan Layden reports, eliminating the tree is complicated by the passive attitude of many landowners, and a state forestry service with little authority.  

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The Two-Way
6:22 pm
Thu July 14, 2011

Parts Of U.S. Emerge From Wave Of Scorching Heat

As Florida temperatures hover in the 90's, boys use a swing rope to cool off in the Suwannee River near Chiefland, Fla.
Phil Sandlin AP

America's South, Midwest and Southwest are suffering through drought and high heat. Those regions have braved a string of days that saw temperatures in the high 90s, with heat indexes commonly reaching above 110 degrees.

But forecasters say much of the eastern U.S. will experience a gradual cool-down in the next few days. "New York and the D.C. area will drop down intothe lower 80s by Friday," the AP said, "while Atlanta drops to the upper 80s Friday and Saturday."

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