Oklahoma Department of Transportation

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the annoucement by Tulsa Republican Senator Dan Newberry that he is resigning his seat effective next January or 2018, 17 Oklahomans sign up to run for election to two legislative seats & Governor Fallin signs the third and final bill to come out of the State Capitol to reform Oklahoma's correction system.

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The Oklahoma Department of Transportation is recalculating its eight year plan.

Director Mike Patterson says this comes after the legislature removed $150 million from the program which keeps work going on Oklahoma’s roads and bridges.

“Last year we had to reduce the eight-year plan by $323 million,” Patterson says. “These are cumulative numbers, and so, if you look over the last six to eight years, the impact has been $800 million.”  

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Speaking at a media event atop an interstate overpass construction site in Norman, U.S. Senator Jim Inhofe told a small crowd Friday that President Donald Trump is serious about a proposed $1 trillion national infrastructure plan.

The Republican is chair of a Senate subcommittee that oversees such programs and he said Oklahoma stands to benefit from a new focus for federal funding.

Bridges in Oklahoma are safe to travel after Saturday’s 5.6 magnitude earthquake.

Department of Transportation Director Mike Patterson says his crews inspected more than 180 bridges in Oklahoma.

"There were three field divisions that responded out of Tulsa, Perry and Buffalo to get those bridges inspected and provide some safe confidence to the traveling public that everything was okay."

In all the crews managed to complete an in depth look at all the bridges about five hours after the quake.

The Oklahoma Department of Transportation has changed its post-earthquake bridge-inspection plan after a year-long study showed no structural damage from seismic activity.

Under the new plan, which went into effect April 1, ODOT will only inspect bridges after magnitude 4.7 or greater quakes. Regions where bridge inspections are required will expand as earthquake intensity increases:

4.7 to 4.8 magnitude — 5-mile inspection radius;

The Oklahoma Department of Transportation wants to hear from you about its Long Range Transportation Plan.

KOSU’s Michael Cross reports the soon-to-be updated 25-year plan will see the state through 2040.

ODOT is holding three meetings next week asking for public help in crafting a transportation plan for the next 25 years.

Director Mike Patterson says he’s looking forward to hearing from people on things like highways, rural transit, waterways and rail.

  The Oklahoma Department of Transportation is raising concerns about a bill heading to the full Senate to take money away from road and bridge projects.

An amended piece of legislation would move the money to common education.

An amendment to House Bill 2642 takes half of the nearly $60 million which would have gone every year to ODOT and gives it to Common Education.

ODOT Director Mike Patterson says while the lack of funding won’t impact work on structurally deficient bridges there are a couple of Oklahoma City projects which could see delays.