Oklahoma City Council

facebook.com/cityofokc

The Oklahoma City Council heard from the public Tuesday morning on bond and sales tax proposals that would inject more than $1.1 billion in funding for public safety and infrastructure.

Sgt. Mark Nelson of the Oklahoma City Fraternal Order of Police advocated for the funds going to public safety, noting that as Oklahoma City's population has grown in the past 20 years, police staffing numbers have remained about the same.

Brian Hardzinski / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

Three new sales tax and bond proposals could raise more than a billion dollars for public projects in Oklahoma City.

Two of the proposals would replace the one-cent MAPS 3 sales tax, which will expire at the end of this year, according to a city press release. Part of the MAPS tax would be replaced by a permanent one-quarter-cent sales tax to be reinvested into the city’s General Fund, which pays for public safety, animal control, parks, transit and other basic services. The tax is expected to generate $26 million per year.

Oklahoma City’s police department is making no changes to its immigration policy following President Trump’s executive order against sanctuary cities.

Police Chief Bill Citty says while Oklahoma City isn’t a sanctuary city, his officers are also not proactive in enforcing immigration laws because it can erode trust in a community.

The Oklahoma City Council passed a resolution Tuesday formally opposing State Question 777, which is commonly known as the “right-to-farm” amendment. The proposal would add a new section to state law guaranteeing farmers and ranchers can operate without interference unless the state has a compelling reason to get involved.

The Oklahoma City Council advances an ordinance to ban everyone from medians not just panhandlers.

The council heard from several citizens opposed to the measure like Derrek Jump, a veteran who advocates for homeless vets. Jump says he’s opposed to the idea of fining and jailing our poorest citizens.

"I think what it boils down to is extra revenue for our great city and the fact that we're willing to create revenue off the backs of our homeless population is absolutely reprehensible," says Jump.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/electricnerve/497858332
Mark Roy, a.k.a. electricnerve / Flickr

A surprising decision from the Oklahoma City Council will allow an upscale gun range to serve alcohol once it finishes renovations. KOSU’s Quinton Chandler reports two council member’s opinions.

Below, read Wilshire Gun Range's alcohol policy: