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twitter.com/Enes_Kanter

A pro-government Turkish newspaper reports the country has issued an arrest warrant for Enes Kanter, claiming the Oklahoma City Thunder forward is a member of a terrorist group.

Kanter was temporarily detained last weekend in Romania, after officials there were notified his passport has been revoked by Turkey, where he is a citizen.

twitter.com/Enes_Kanter

Oklahoma City Thunder forward Enes Kanter, a Swiss-born Turkish citizen, is back in the United States, following his detainment at a Romanian airport over the weekend.

Kanter fled Indonesia, where he was hosting a basketball clinic in Jakarta, on Saturday after his manager was awoke him in the middle of the night.

"My manager knocked on my door around 2.30am and said we need to talk. He said the secret service of Indonesia and army is looking for you. Turkish government called them and said he’s a dangerous man, we need to talk to him."

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This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer, and time for sports.

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