Music

Last weekend, thousands of uncommonly refined punks flooded the Estonian town of Rakvere to participate in the third Punk Song Festival (previous gatherings were held in 2008 and 2011).

Toronto singer Lowell makes bubblegum pop — if that bubblegum has been stuck irreverently under a desk, or spit defiantly onto the ground. Her music is sweet, but with an intentional, inseparable grit. Such is the case on her latest release, "Ride," a spiky, MIA-adjacent summer anthem featuring Swedish electropop stars Icona Pop. As with prior singles from both Lowell and Icona Pop, "Ride" is as much a mission statement as it is a pop song.

This fall is stacked with highly anticipated new albums from some of the brightest names in music. We're going to celebrate September's bounty with a pair of back-to-back First Listen Live concerts in NYC with the bands The Arcs and Beirut.

The dance music that moves us in these waning days of summer often does so in minuscule ways. Maybe it has something to do with the merciless mercury levels, but a good portion of our Recommended Dose mix for August doesn't require the flailing of arms and legs. Your brain, however, should be mightily entertained.

The tracklisting includes new music from underground star Joy Orbison, space disco from Japan, ambient beats from Paris, electro from England and a meditative warehouse juggernaut from Belgium.

In her autobiography, 14th century nun and Spanish mystic Teresa of Ávila wrote of her encounter with an angel that thrust a "long spear of gold" into her heart: "The pain was so great, that it made me moan; and yet so surpassing was the sweetness of this excessive pain, that I could not wish to be rid of it.

BOOTS is the most interesting new artist I've heard in 2015. You may have first encountered him writing and producing songs on Beyoncé's self-titled 2013 album. Earlier this year we premiered BOOTS' self-directed engaging short film/music video Motorcycle Jesus, complete with five brand new songs: his own songs.

Twenty years ago this week, Microsoft introduced its Windows 95 operating system on CD-ROM. One of the legacies of the operating system was its dreamy startup music, composed by legendary producer Brian Eno and titled "The Microsoft Sound." It lasts six seconds.

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This is Sample Size, our weekly new music feature with KOSU's Ryan LaCroix and LOOKatOKC pop music columnist Matt Carney.

Today, we play a wonderful mixture of blues and southern rock from Los Colognes, touches of soft rock from Destroyer, and light and hazy dance sounds from Yumi Zouma.

Follow Matt & Ryan on Twitter at @OKmattcarney and @KOSUryan.

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