Mary Fallin

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Executives of oil and coal companies pushed Gov. Mary Fallin to “pay more attention” to their industries in public remarks, according to state emails obtained by Greenwire.

The emails, obtained through the Oklahoma Open Records Act, detail internal discussions as Fallin’s prepared for the 2013 Governor’s Energy Conference, Manuel Quiñones and Mike Soraghan report.

Oklahoma Department of Corrections

McALESTER, Okla. (AP) — The latest on the scheduled execution of Oklahoma death row inmate Richard Glossip (all times local):

12:55 p.m.

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin says she'll respect whatever decision the Oklahoma Court of Criminal Appeals makes as it reviews evidence in a condemned inmate's case.

The appeals court halted Richard Glossip's execution just hours before it was to take place Wednesday afternoon. In a statement, Fallin reiterated that Glossip's case should be decided in court, not by popular opinion.

The Oklahoma Board of Corrections has voted to support a directive from Gov. Mary Fallin that could mean releasing some inmates convicted of violent crimes — including murder and rape.

Fallin wrote in July that the board was misinterpreting state law on crimes that require convicts serve 85 percent of their sentence.

Fallin said the law allows inmates to earn good behavior credits throughout their sentence. Inmates had not been awarded the credits until after serving the 85 percent — meaning they were not released until serving 90 percent or more of their sentences.

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

In the five years since earthquakes first began blitzing Oklahoma, state officials have been hesitant to agree with scientists who blamed the oil and gas industry.

While the shaking doesn’t appear to be slowing, the regulatory response is now quickly ramping up.

When Gov. Mary Fallin talked about the earthquakes a year ago at the 2014 state energy conference, she was circumspect and noncommittal.

“Many have been quick out in the public sector, or even in the private sector, to draw conclusions about its cause,” she said in remarks opening the Oklahoma City event last year

As scientific evidence has mounted, however, the doubt has eroded. Speaking at the state Capitol last week, Fallin publicly agreed with what researchers have said for years.

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Monday finalized its Clean Power Plan, the Obama Administration’s attempt to cut carbon emissions from power plants by more than 30 percent nationwide.

Though just finalized, the plan has been in the works for two years, and Oklahoma officials have opposed it every step of the way.

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

In November 2011, a 5.7-magnitude earthquake struck near Prague, Okla., causing significant damage and injuring two people. Right away, the possibility that the disposal of wastewater by injecting it deep into the earth — part of the hydraulic fracturing process — was to blame came up.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the Governor signing the $7.1B budget as well as the bill which bans cities and counties from banning oil and gas drilling.

The trio also discusses Oklahoma's Senators saying yes to a bill supported by President Obama: The USA Freedom Act, the decision to ban all prisoner marriages until the Supreme Court rules on same sex marriages and the ruling by the Supreme Court against Tulsa's Abercrombie & Fitch.

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Gov. Mary Fallin on May 29 signed into law a bill preventing towns, cities and counties from banning hydraulic fracturing and other oil and gas activities.

Emily Wendler

One way or another, the third grade reading test will be different next school year. The reading committees that lessen the high-stakes nature of the test are slated to dissolve at the end of this school year. But there's a bill in the legislature that could extend them for another three years. However, with that bill comes further changes to the test.

Under Oklahoma’s Reading Sufficiency Act, the third-grade reading test is a high-stakes test. Meaning, if students don’t do well, they could be held back.

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin signed a law today allowing nitrogen to be used in executions in the state in case lethal injection is ruled unconstitutional or the drugs are not available.

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