Homelessness

US News
9:42 am
Sun April 5, 2015

Lowering A City's Homeless Population — By Forcing The Homeless Out

The city of Hollywood, Fla., bought the Homeless Voice shelter from its owner, a longtime advocate for the homeless who agreed to stay away from the city for the next 30 years.
Greg Allen

Originally published on Sun April 5, 2015 11:19 am

It's been a week of goodbyes at the Homeless Voice in Hollywood, Fla. For nearly 13 years, this rundown, 22-room hotel operated as a homeless shelter.

On most nights, hotel manager Christine Jordan says, more than 200 homeless men and women stayed here, some sleeping on mats in the cafeteria.

"We called this the emergency level ... almost 40 people in here every night," she says. Some stayed for free and others paid on a sliding scale. "[Now], everything's gone. I can't cry anymore."

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Around the Nation
3:25 am
Wed January 28, 2015

Homeless Man Encourages Others On The Streets To 'Get Up'

Tony Simmons leads a group of Johns Hopkins University students on a "justice walk" in downtown Baltimore, during which they learn about public policy, providing services, and the connections between income inequality and health.
Gabriella Demczuk for NPR

Originally published on Tue March 31, 2015 3:33 pm

This story begins an occasional series about individuals who don't have much money or power but do have a big impact on their communities.

Sometimes, the people you'd least expect are those who do the most. People like Tony Simmons, a homeless man in Baltimore who helps others get off the street. Simmons says he does it as much for himself as for anyone else.

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JenX with Jennifer Martin
8:50 am
Tue January 13, 2015

Should We Give Money to Panhandlers?

Credit time.com

As you drive around in Oklahoma City, you’re bound to see them, people on the curbs with cardboard signs asking for jobs or money.

In this week’s JenX, while it might be instinct to give to them, Jennifer Martin observes that might not be the right thing.


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PhilanthroPete
10:45 am
Mon November 10, 2014

Help KOSU Share the Stories of Oklahoma City's Homeless Population

Every story has dignity and a uniquely human touch, but some stories are harder to tell than others.

When KOSU opened a studio in Oklahoma City’s Film Row district, we started working one block away from the City Rescue Mission and came in daily contact with the homeless community. We wanted to find a way to tell their story, a story that is mostly untold with dignity.

Now, with your help, we have an opportunity to do that. With the inspiration of programs like StoryCorps and Youth Radio, we are raising funds so the homeless community can tell its story in a very personal way.

KOSU will lend its expertise in radio and sound mixing, and your gift will help recruit members of the homeless community and buy recorders to allow them to tell their own stories. KOSU will then help them mix down the sound into a documentary that we will air and make available for podcast.

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US News
2:42 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

More Cities Are Making It Illegal To Hand Out Food To The Homeless

The homeless and others in need enjoy lunch at the Los Angeles Mission on Nov. 23, 2011, in celebration of Thanksgiving. Legislation to ban organizations from serving food to homeless people in public places has been proposed in Los Angeles.
Frederic J. Brown AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 5:54 pm

If you don't have a place to live, getting enough to eat clearly may be a struggle. And since homelessness in the U.S. isn't going away and is even rising in some cities, more charitable groups and individuals have been stepping up the past few years to share food with these vulnerable folks in their communities.

But just as more people reach out to help, cities are biting back at those hands feeding the homeless.

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Around the Nation
10:38 am
Tue September 16, 2014

Homeless Vets: They're Not Just Single Men Anymore

Alexander Morales, who served in the Army in the 1970s, with his family: wife Roberta; Elvia, 7, Elena, 8, and Elvira, 7 (in front), and Ruben Verdugo, 13, and Aaron D. Huerta, 17 (in back). Morales' family has been going for years to the Stand Down event in San Diego, where veterans receive assistance.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Thu September 25, 2014 4:49 pm

Every summer for 27 years, a small tent city has popped up in San Diego. "Stand Down" is a three-day oasis for homeless veterans, with showers, new clothes, hot meals, medical help, legal aid and a booth set up for every housing program in the city.

Increasingly, the event needs ways to keep children entertained.

"They've got the kids zone and everything. My kids live out here very happy. They're looking forward to it from last year," says Alex Morales, who served in the Army in the 1970s.

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JenX
8:48 am
Tue September 16, 2014

A Different View of Home Economics

Transformer18 Flickr Creative commons

In Oklahoma, it’s not uncommon to see panhandlers -- people who’ve fallen on hard times, asking for help on the side of the street.  Many of them have no permanent place to live.  On this week’s JenX, Jennifer Dennis Smith looks at homelessness in Oklahoma from a mother’s perspective.


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Uniquely Oklahoma
7:40 am
Fri January 24, 2014

The Curbside Chronicle: A Hand Up, Not A Handout

Pictured from left to right: Curbside Chronicle Executive Director Whitley O’Connor, artist and Curbside Chronicle vendor Merl Childs, and Curbside Chronicle Editor Ranya Forgotson
Nikole Robinson Carroll KOSU

Street paper The Curbside Chronicle strives to help the homeless get back to what the rest of us consider a “normal” life while showing the general public what homelessness really looks like.

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