Education

Education is historically considered to be the thing that levels the playing field, capable of lifting up the less advantaged and improving their chances for success.

"Play by the rules, work hard, apply yourself and do well in school, and that will open doors for you," is how Karl Alexander, a Johns Hopkins University sociologist, puts it.

But a study published in June suggests that the things that really make the difference — between prison and college, success and failure, sometimes even life and death — are money and family.

Adrienne Keene is a post-doctoral researcher at Brown University, the author of the popular blog "Native Appropriations" and a member of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

For more on the state of play nationwide for the Common Core we're joined by Cory Turner from the NPR Ed Team. Hey there, Cory.

CORY TURNER, BYLINE: Hey, Audie.

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KOSU is looking for college students who want to join the station as part of a program for the upcoming semester.

Students can attend any college and use the experience as internship, practicum or independent study credits.

Classes will be held once a week in Oklahoma City and Stillwater.

Students will also be producing original news content for on air and online, just like the following students.

Chloe Charlton's story on OSU ballet honoring Maria Tallchief:

The Politics Of The Common Core

Jun 20, 2014

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal said Wednesday that he wants to cut ties with the Common Core State Standards, the benchmarks in reading and math that he helped bring to the state four years ago, and replace them with new, Louisiana-specific standards.

"We won't let the federal government take over Louisiana's education standards," Jindal said in a statement. "We're very alarmed about choice and local control over curriculum being taken away from parents and educators."

Tracey Montgomery / Restore Oklahoma Public Education

Home-schooling mom Jenni White gave some of the loudest cheers when Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin signed legislation to repeal the Common Core education standards.

White, president of Restore Oklahoma Public Education, helped organize rallies, robo calls and letters to legislators encouraging the repeal. "You name it. We had to do it," White said. "We just had to do it out of a shoestring budget out of our own accounts."

The average cost of one college year across all degree-granting intuitions in the U.S. was more than $19,000 in 2012, and we don't need to tell you what direction the price is heading. Which means lots of students are now borrowing heavily to make college work. President Obama threw some of them a lifeline earlier this week, with revisions to the government's Pay As You Earn program.

Gates To States: No Stakes Yet For Core Tests

Jun 10, 2014

Politicians, parents and plenty of anxious teachers have long called for a free pass on next year's tests aligned to the Common Core State Standards.

It's not that they want out of them entirely (though some do). Most simply want to be sure teachers and students aren't judged on scores from this first generation of Core tests. And now, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation agrees:

Tough Week For The Common Core

Jun 9, 2014

A few months ago, when I told friends and media colleagues that I was interested in the Common Core State Standards, the most common response was "What's that?"

Now, it seems, everyone has an opinion about the Core.

And right now, opinions about the K-12 learning goals for math and English that have spread nearly nationwide are trending toward the heated.

While the school year is winding down, education policy sure isn't. This past week brought a bunch of front-page news on the Common Core.

Governor Fallin signs legislation which ends Common Core State Standards in the State of Oklahoma.

KOSU’s Michael Cross reports educators now wait for new standards from the State Department of Education.

Governor Fallin signed House Bill 3399 to repeal and replace Common Core with new standards to be developed by 2016.

Fallin told reporters at a news conference late yesterday that everyone will have an input in Oklahoma education, “Superintendents, educators, parent, public policy officials, Superintendent of Education, employers, citizens.”

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