Emily Wendler / KOSU

The state superintendent is calling Oklahoma’s school accountability system deeply flawed, and a waste of a million dollars. Three years ago, when it went into effect, proponents hoped it would motivate schools to improve. But instead it’s just been a contentious issue. 

By law, schools in Oklahoma are given a grade- A through F- based on student test scores, and other data. But according to state superintendent, Joy Hofmeister, these grades are no good.

Emily Wendler / KOSU

University of Oklahoma President, David Boren, and his education advocacy group filed a petition with the Secretary of State Monday, that will ask voters to support a one-cent sales tax increase to fund education.

“Are our kids worth a penny?” Boren asked his listeners at the state capitol.

Various estimates say the tax could cost an Oklahoma family anywhere from $75 to $250 a year.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross holds a lengthy discussion with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the second stay of execution for Richard Glossip as well as the future of the Ten Commandments monument at the State Capitol.

The trio also discuss a plan by former Senator and Governor David Boren for a one cent sales tax to fund education and agency heads warned by legislative leaders to be ready for deeper cuts.

Sarabi Rodriguez was a third-grader when she started planning for college at the Barrio Logan College Institute.

“As soon as you’re accepted, it’s not, are you going to go to college? It’s where you’re going to go to college,” she said. 

In the fall, she’s heading to the University of California, Berkeley, her dream college.

Flickr / Brian Cantoni

According to data recently released by the ACT, or American College Test, only 22 percent of Oklahoma students were ready for college courses in math, English, social science and biology when they graduated from high school.  Nationally, 28 percent of students met the benchmark scores in all four subjects.

Oklahoma students have maintained an average score of 20.7 on the test for the past five years. Nationwide, scores have gone down slightly since 2011. The national average for 2015 was 21.0

Here's a number to help frame the debate over whether middle schools and high schools should start later in the morning: A study finds that only 18 percent of these public schools start class at 8:30 a.m. or later, as the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends.

The Oklahoma State Department of Education held a town hall meeting Tuesday night—and invited the public to comment on the newly proposed state academic standards.

The new academic framework has been crafted to replace the Common Core standards that Gov. Mary Fallin repealed last year. Educators gave short presentations—then opened the floor up for questions and comments.

Math teacher Sherry Read's classroom is a total mess. The students are gone for the summer, and light fixtures dangle from the ceiling. The floor has a layer of dust. Down the hallway, workers make a racket while they renovate the school, which dates back to the 1890s. They're working in what has become an archaeological site.

The Washington Post looks at the variation in education spending across the nation and maps out per pupil spending by state. Oklahoma is currently ranked 47th in spending at $7,672 per pupil.

Emily Wendler

One way or another, the third grade reading test will be different next school year. The reading committees that lessen the high-stakes nature of the test are slated to dissolve at the end of this school year. But there's a bill in the legislature that could extend them for another three years. However, with that bill comes further changes to the test.

Under Oklahoma’s Reading Sufficiency Act, the third-grade reading test is a high-stakes test. Meaning, if students don’t do well, they could be held back.