Donald Trump

Supporters Reflect On a Year of Trump

22 hours ago
Amber Hall / The Takeaway

About a year ago, hours after Donald Trump was sworn into office, The Takeaway traveled to Oklahoma and sat down with one family of Republicans, The McConnells, who were divided in their support for the president. 

"I think he's too bombastic. I think he goes overboard but I think he appeals to a lot of people, and in some ways, he appeals to me," said Wayne McConnell.

Updated at 4 p.m. ET

Nearly all of the seats on the U.S. National Park Service advisory board are vacant following a mass resignation Monday night, with ex-members citing Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke's unwillingness to meet with them.

Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort may not be headed for trial on money laundering and conspiracy charges until late autumn. The judge in his case expressed puzzlement over some of the legal positions he has taken.

Lawyers for Justice Department special counsel Robert Mueller have turned over thousands of pages of material to Manafort and his former business partner Richard Gates, a process that prosecutors said is continuing.

But at least part of the holdup in the case is Manafort's own making, Judge Amy Berman Jackson said.

Last week President Trump reportedly singled out Haiti, El Salvador and African nations as "shithole countries" whose people were not the kind of immigrants the United States wanted. At the time, I happened to be in Serekunda, Gambia's largest urban area, as Trump's slur shocked people across Africa. The anger was palpable.

Updated at 1:40 a.m. ET Tuesday

Some members of the Trump administration started off the holiday honoring Martin Luther King Jr. at a wreath-laying ceremony at the civil rights leader's memorial in Washington Monday. But the president's first stop was his own golf club.

Updated at 6:50 p.m. ET

The nation's top spy bosses scrambled to the White House early Thursday to urge President Trump to restate his support for a controversial surveillance law after he spent the morning trashing it on Twitter.

CIA Director Mike Pompeo, Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats, White House chief of staff John Kelly and national security adviser H.R. McMaster all convened in the Oval Office with the president to urge him to row back his criticism. House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., also joined in by telephone.

Updated at 12:20 p.m. ET

A controversial spying law survived in the House after a kerfuffle on Thursday when President Trump took aim at the bill despite his administration's formal support for it.

The House voted to reauthorize snooping provisions known by the Capitol Hill shorthand "Section 702," which are due to expire next week, and to extend the authority for six more years. The Senate would need to vote next in order to preserve them.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Let's ask what people really talk about when they talk about chain migration.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP: Chain migration is a total disaster which threatens our security and our economy.

The infamous Russia dossier was not the sole basis for the FBI's investigation into Donald Trump's ties to Russia, according to a newly public document that notched a tactical win for Democrats inside Washington, D.C.

Updated at 4:42 p.m. ET

The former British intelligence officer who authored the infamous Russia dossier wanted to show it to the FBI because he was concerned that then-presidential candidate Donald Trump was being "blackmailed."

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