death penalty

US News
4:10 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Controversy Over Two-Hour Execution In Arizona

A fence surrounds the state prison in Florence, Ariz. Joseph Rudolph Wood was executed. (AP)

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 2:39 pm

Another problematic prison execution is further fueling debate over the death penalty in the U.S.

At a state prison in Florence, Ariz. yesterday, it took almost two hours for convicted double murderer Joseph Wood to die after he was injected with a combination of sedative and painkiller. This problematic execution follows the one in Oklahoma that went awry in April.

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Around the Nation
1:32 pm
Mon June 30, 2014

Small But Steady Downward Trend In U.S. Executions

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Here's a little-noticed fact about the death penalty. We've heard a big debate about how to execute people - lethal injection, electric chair, firing squad. That debate obscures a little-noticed fact - the number of people executed by any method is way down in the United States in recent years. NPR justice correspondent Carrie Johnson has been covering this story. She's in our studios. Hi, Carrie.

CARRIE JOHNSON, BYLINE: Hi, Steve.

INSKEEP: How far down?

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23rd & Lincoln
8:40 am
Mon June 30, 2014

Nearly 100 Requests for Interim Studies Filed By Oklahoma Lawmakers

The 2014 Oklahoma legislative session officially ended last month, but as The Journal Record’s Marie Price explains, there’s still work to be done and issues to study.

You can find more of Marie’s insights on the capitol at JRLR.net.

The Two-Way
6:08 am
Sat June 28, 2014

Oklahoma, Arizona Inmates Sue To Stop Executions

The gurney in the execution chamber at the Oklahoma State Penitentiary. Inmates there say that multi-drug executions are a form of human experimentation.
AP

Originally published on Sat June 28, 2014 11:38 am

Death row inmates in two states are taking legal action to stop states from using the kind of multi-drug protocol that resulted in botched executions in Oklahoma and Ohio.

The inmates are not challenging their convictions or death sentences, only the way in which the sentences are to be carried out, notes the Guardian.

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The Two-Way
11:10 am
Tue May 13, 2014

With Just Hours To Go, Federal Court Halts Texas Execution

A Texas judge halted the planned execution of Robert Campbell, saying his lawyers could not fairly prepare an ineligibility claim because the state had not provided them with relevant information. Campbell is mentally disabled.
Texas Dept. of Criminal Justice AP

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 1:21 pm

Update at 4:57 p.m. ET. Federal Court Halts Execution:

With just hours to go, a federal court has halted the execution of Texas inmate Robert Campbell.

The execution would have been the first since Oklahoma botched one in April.

The ruling has nothing to do with the drug shortage that's dominated the narrative over the death penalty in the country. Instead, Campbell's lawyers argued that the state knew that Campbell was intellectually disabled but did not let his defense team know that.

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On Tap
2:03 pm
Mon May 12, 2014

May's On Tap Focuses on the Death Penalty

Credit Picasso's Cafe / Facebook

Join us on Wednesday, May 28 at 6pm for this month's On Tap at Picasso Cafe in Oklahoma City.

Our topic this month is the death penalty and our panelists will be Oklahoma County Asst. DA Scott Rowland and University of Oklahoma law professor Rick Tepker.

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Around the Nation
9:27 am
Fri May 9, 2014

Oklahoma Delays Next Execution For 6 Months

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 3:26 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

On a Friday, it's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

The state of Oklahoma now has at least six more months to get to know Charles Warner. He's a man who was scheduled to die, is sentenced for a brutal crime. But the state attorney general agreed to a stay of execution. That gives the state time to investigate the way it puts people to death. The investigation follows the execution of Clayton Lockett, a proceeding that took 43 minutes and intensified debate over the death penalty.

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Lethal Injection
6:01 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

The Messy Legal Road That Led To Oklahoma's Botched Execution

Republican Gov. Mary Fallin of Oklahoma, here with Michael C. Thompson, state secretary of safety and security, charged that the state Supreme Court had exceeded its jurisdiction when it called for a stay of execution in the Clayton Lockett case in March.
Alonzo Adams AP

Originally published on Thu May 8, 2014 11:08 pm

Although most of the country just became aware of issues with Oklahoma's capital punishment protocols last week after Clayton Lockett's bungled execution, his lawyers had been worried for months. That's because in January, two condemned men in different states but injected with the same new drug cocktail endured executions that went badly. Lockett's lawyer, Susanna Gattoni, was unable to keep him from suffering a similar fate last week.

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12:05 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

'Father of Lethal Injection' Talks About History, His Legacy to Oklahoma

Lead in text: 
The Tulsa World profiles Dr. Jay Chapman, Oklahoma's first chief medical examiner who invented the process of lethal injection.
The doctor who came up with the method talks about his legacy in Oklahoma and the U.S. Posted: Thursday, May 8, 2014 12:00 am | (%remaining%) Remaining Thanks for visiting the Tulsa World. You're entitled to view a limited number of free articles every 30 days.
Politics
5:15 am
Thu May 8, 2014

The Executioner's Lament

Dr. Jay Chapman, pictured here in 2007, developed the original formula for lethal injections with the intention of making executions in the U.S. more humane.
Ben Margot AP

Originally published on Fri May 9, 2014 2:47 pm

In 1977, death row inmate Gary Mark Gilmore chose to be executed by a firing squad. Gilmore was strapped to a chair at the Utah State Prison, and five officers shot him.

The media circus that ensued prompted a group of lawmakers in nearby Oklahoma to wonder if there might be a better way to handle executions. They approached Dr. Jay Chapman, the state medical examiner at the time, who proposed using three drugs, based loosely on anesthesia procedures at the time: one drug to knock out the inmates, one to relax or paralyze them, and a final drug that would stop their hearts.

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