2018 Elections

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the 2018 candidate filings which resulted in nearly 800 people deciding to run for public office, State Attorney General Mike Hunter faces a challenge to his candidacy based off his residency and lawmakers advance seven bills designed to reform Oklahoma's criminal justice system.

In a congressional district that is considered as red as the sun is bright, Democrats see a tiny opening in an upcoming special election in Arizona after a surprising victory in a similar race last month in Pennsylvania.

Voters in Arizona's 8th Congressional District, northwest of Phoenix, are choosing a replacement for Trent Franks, who resigned abruptly last year amid sexual harassment allegations.

The gun issue is beginning to wane in voters' minds ahead of the November midterm elections, a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll finds.

While almost half of all registered voters (46 percent) say a candidate's position on gun policy will be a major factor in deciding whom to vote for, that number is down 13 points from February, when a shooting at a Florida high school sparked outrage.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the teacher walkout to call for more funding for education enters week two at the State Capitol, candidate filing for the 2018 elections begins with record breaking numbers and Attorney General Mike Hunter releases an audit showing cleanup at the Tar Creek Superfund site might have cost the state millions of dollars.

A record 600 candidates filed for public office Wednesday and Thursday. The candidate filing period ends at 5 p.m. on Friday. While there has been significant increased interest in public office overall, many statewide and legislative offices still have unopposed candidates.  

At the end of Day 2 of candidate filing the numbers are as follows.

Statewide Races 

The Oklahoma State Election Board is heading into this week's candidate filing period with the possibility of thousands of teachers, students and education supporters still rallying at the Capitol.

In preparation of the crowds, officials are moving the filing location from the second floor of the capitol down to just inside the west entrance on the ground level, in order to avoid crowds possibly still packed in the area.

The latest flash point in the nation's gun debate sent millions of Americans marching into the streets over the weekend in cities like Denver to call for stricter gun laws.

"I've never, until this year I haven't contributed a dime in my entire life to anybody's campaign. This year? I've given more money than I ever thought I would do," said David Frieder, a retiree who attended Saturday's gun march in downtown Denver.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about a two week deadline for lawmakers to come up with funding for pay raises for teachers and state workers or face a walkout by both groups and an announcement by the state Attorney General and Director of the Department of Corrections that Oklahoma will soon be using nitrogen gas to execute people on death row.

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson sounded an alarm this week: The Russians are already meddling in the 2018 midterm elections.

"The point is that if their intention is to interfere, they're going to find ways to do that," Tillerson told Fox News. "I think it's important we just continue to say to Russia, look, you think we don't see what you're doing. We do see it, and you need to stop."

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