2017 legislative session

Emily Wendler / StateImpact Oklahoma

The Oklahoma City Public School Board of Education unanimously approved a resolution on Monday that gives district leadership the green light to pursue a lawsuit against the state.

Board members say lawmakers are not adequately funding education and they hope legal action changes that.

The resolution says legislative leaders don’t give schools enough money to do what is required of them by law, and therefore have failed to comply with their constitutional responsibility to fund public education.

Oklahoma Supreme Court Strikes Down Cigarette Fee

Aug 10, 2017
Flickr / Fried Dough

The Supreme Court of the State of Oklahoma has ruled that a fee on cigarettes approved during the 2017 legislative session is unconstitutional.

Flickr / Fried Dough

Oklahoma Supreme Court justices considered arguments Tuesday that challenged the constitutionality of four bills passed during this year’s legislative session.

The legal challenges throw into question millions of dollars of state revenue that fund government agencies.

More than half the oil and gas a typical horizontal well will produce over its lifetime in Oklahoma is pumped to the surface during its first three years, a new report from Oklahoma Watch shows.

About exactly a year ago we brought you the story of Shawn Sheehan, Oklahoma's 2016 Teacher of the Year.

At the time, he and about 40 other educators were running for office in the state, wanting to make a change because, as Sheehan puts it, lawmakers weren't prioritizing education. Funding for schools in the state has been cut tremendously over the past decade and teachers in Oklahoma are some of the lowest paid in the country.

Victor A. Pozadas

Beginning July 1, a new fee will be implemented to all professional sports tickets sold in the state.

Oklahomans can expect this hike to affect prices on tickets for teams like the Oklahoma City Thunder, Energy FC, and Dodgers, as well as the Tulsa Oilers, Roughnecks FC, and Drillers.

House Bill 2361 was signed into law earlier this year to help fill the state's almost $900 million dollar budget shortfall. This fee is projected to generate around $2.6 million dollars a year.

facebook.com/GaryRichardsonOK

Gary Richardson, a Republican candidate for Oklahoma governor in 2018, is filing a lawsuit disputing the constitutionality of three House Bills recently signed into law.

The bills add new fees onto electric or compressed natural gas vehicles, automobile purchases, and some tax return filings.

Flickr / dsledge

Four attorneys have filed a lawsuit over Oklahoma’s new drunk driving law, deeming it unconstitutional.

The lawsuit was filed Monday against Governor Mary Fallin, several state lawmakers, and Oklahoma’s public safety commissioner.

The lawsuit says the new law, which Fallin signed into law on June 8, violates the state Constitution’s ban on bills containing more than one subject.

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Brian Hardzinski / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

Two of the largest tobacco companies in the U.S. are suing Oklahoma over the state’s new cigarette fee.

R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. and Philip Morris USA Inc. filed a brief with the Oklahoma Supreme Court Wednesday, along with several Oklahoma companies and individuals.

In the brief, plaintiffs argue the $1.50-per-pack cigarette fee, or the “Smoking Cessation Act,” “flagrantly violates” the Oklahoma constitution.

The fee is scheduled to take effect in August, and would generate about $215 million per year for the state.

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