The Spy

The Spy is your go-to location for independent, local music and features more than 20 unique specialty shows that include 80s New Wave, Rockabilly, Soul, Punk and Post-Punk, Classic Alternative, Blues and Roots, Reggae, and much, much more. Additionally, The Spy hosts an all-vinyl show, a wine-and-music pairing show, a dating show, and an Oklahoma music show. Thes­­­­e specialty shows set The Spy apart from traditional corporate radio.

Ferris O’Brien’s brand of The Spy has existed since 1998 when he took over as the Program Director at 93.7 The Spy (KSPI-FM in Stillwater). When station owners took The Spy off the air in 2001, Ferris secured ownership of the brand and moved it to Oklahoma City. In 2002, Citadel Communications launched a deep alternative format radio station (KSYY) and asked Ferris to take the helm. The station was killed in June 2004, but Ferris kept “Spy Radio” on the air as a once weekly specialty show on 100.5 The KATT. In 2009, Ferris purchased 105.3fm from Citadel and relaunched The Spy. When that purchase agreement feel through in December 2010, he took the station completely digital at thespyfm.com. In 2012, The Spy and KOSU established a new partnership that allowed The Spy to return to the FM dial.

You can listen to The Spy 7 days a week from 7pm to 5am, plus 11am-1pm on Sundays, on KOSU-FM 91.7 Oklahoma City, 107.5 Tulsa, 88.3 Stillwater, and 94.9 Ponca City.

You can also listen to The Spy 24 hours a day, 7 days a week at thespyfm.com.

In music and the culture it reflects, 2017 was predictably unpredictable: idols fell, empires shook, consensus was scarce. This conversation is one of five with artists, makers and thinkers whose work captured something unique about a chaotic year, and hinted at bigger revelations around the bend.

Last week, we counted down the top 25 Oklahoma songs of 2017. In total, we played 435 new songs on The Oklahoma Rock Show in 2017, so our final list was extremely competitive.

Check out our picks below.

25. St. Vincent - "Pills"

24. Gabriel Royal - "Say It's Right"

When it comes to maligning the news media, Morrissey has few peers. As he sings in "Spent The Day In Bed," a song from his most recent album Low In High School: "I recommend that you stop / watching the news / because the news contrives to frighten you / to make you feel small and alone / to make you feel that your mind isn't your own."

Nina Simone, Bon Jovi, The Moody Blues, The Cars and Dire Straits — along with guitar pioneer Sister Rosetta Tharpe, with an award for early influence — have been named as next year's inductees to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland.

Pat DiNizio, a singer and songwriter who made popular rock songs as the leader of The Smithereens, died on Tuesday at age 62, his fellow band members say. No cause of death was provided.

Alysse Gafkjen / Courtesy of the artist

In this session we welcome JD McPherson, the Oklahoman who made retro rock sound modern with "North Side Gal." There's a reason his new album Undivided Heart & Soul sounds different. McPherson uprooted his family from Oklahoma to Nashville, Tenn., and ended up making the new album at the historic RCA Studio B — whose walls have soaked up music from major country acts for decades. Elvis, Charley Pride, Floyd Cramer: They all recorded there. In fact, the studio is a museum in the daytime.

Three deals of acquisitions and investments that were rumored over the past week, and that are all now confirmed, have something in common — none of them involve companies owned by major record labels. All involve technology companies or insurrectionists to entrenched industry leaders. One noted below, Tencent, holds such power in its home country that all three major labels agreed to let it broker their deals in that country.

Jeremy Charles / Fire Thief Productions

“So much of its original identity is gone because of the Christianization that has happened. If you look around my house, every book that says Choctaw on it, anything about songs … it’s just Christian hymns being sung in the Choctaw language. There were definitely songs my great-grandpa was singing before they started singing whatever Christian hymns were being [sung].”

Casey Pierce/Courtesy of the artist

Each month, NPR Music asks our friends at public radio stations around the country for the songs they can't stop spinning. Whether it's a new song from a local artist or a band from the other side of the world, the mix is likely to include something you've never heard before.

November's playlist includes a song from an avant-garde Russian band with hints of new wave, a nostalgic country-folk song perfect for a campfire and a genre-blending song by a pair of 19-year-old producers.

Glintshake, 'Убожество'

From ОЭЩ МАГЗИУ

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