The Spy

The Spy is your go-to location for independent, local music and features more than 20 unique specialty shows that include 80s New Wave, Rockabilly, Soul, Punk and Post-Punk, Classic Alternative, Blues and Roots, Reggae, and much, much more. Additionally, The Spy hosts an all-vinyl show, a wine-and-music pairing show, a dating show, and an Oklahoma music show. Thes­­­­e specialty shows set The Spy apart from traditional corporate radio.

Ferris O’Brien’s brand of The Spy has existed since 1998 when he took over as the Program Director at 93.7 The Spy (KSPI-FM in Stillwater). When station owners took The Spy off the air in 2001, Ferris secured ownership of the brand and moved it to Oklahoma City. In 2002, Citadel Communications launched a deep alternative format radio station (KSYY) and asked Ferris to take the helm. The station was killed in June 2004, but Ferris kept “Spy Radio” on the air as a once weekly specialty show on 100.5 The KATT. In 2009, Ferris purchased 105.3fm from Citadel and relaunched The Spy. When that purchase agreement feel through in December 2010, he took the station completely digital at thespyfm.com. In 2012, The Spy and KOSU established a new partnership that allowed The Spy to return to the FM dial.

You can listen to The Spy 7 days a week from 7pm to 5am, plus 11am-1pm on Sundays, on KOSU-FM 91.7 Oklahoma City, 107.5 Tulsa, 88.3 Stillwater, and 94.9 Ponca City.

You can also listen to The Spy 24 hours a day, 7 days a week at thespyfm.com.

MORGAN NOELLE SMITH / NPR

When you hear John Moreland's sweet voice, it's hard to believe he spent years singing in punk, metal-core and hardcore bands. You can still hear that passion in his music, only now it's punctuated by his acoustic guitar.

"Thank you for allowing me to be the first black woman to headline Coachella," Beyoncé said toward the end of her headlining set at Coachella Valley Music & Arts Festival last Saturday while glistening with sweat and her waist-length, gold hair flowing in the fan-created breeze. The chart-topping Queen Bey paused for only a moment before scoffing, "Ain't that 'bout a bitch."

Bey's candid acknowledgment of this elephant in the desert simultaneously silenced any doubters and ignited her Beyhive.

On this week's quick run through some of the best new albums out on April 20, All Songs Considered's Robin Hilton chats with NPR Music's Ann Powers and Stephen Thompson about the primal pop of Kimbra, dark and majestic songs from Exitmusic, Nashville veterans The Old Crow Medicine Show, the rock-and-soul of Shuggie Otis and more.

An attorney for Carver County, Minn., announced today that no charges will be brought in connection with Prince's death and that the musician likely had no idea the vicodin pills he overdosed on were laced with the powerful opioid fentanyl.

"There is no evidence that any person associated with Prince knew that Prince possessed counterfeit pills that contained fentanyl," attorney Mark Metz said during a news conference. "Prince likely had no idea he was taking fentanyl pills that could kill him.

John Prine never really liked his singing voice. "The only reason I figured out I didn't like my old records to listen was I could hear how nervous I was, and how uncomfortable I was," the venerated musician says. "And who would want to sit around and listen to yourself being uncomfortable?"

Today, Prine is releasing The Tree of Forgiveness, his first album of new material in 13 years, to an audience that spans generations.

NPR Music's Stephen Thompson and Ann Powers join host Robin Hilton for a quick run-through some of the most essential new albums out on April 13, starting with the Korean surf-rock band Say Sue Me and their wistful and gritty album Where We Were Together.

Last year, from spring to summer, two organizations — the Nashville Songwriters Association International (NSAI) and the National Music Publishers Association (NMPA) — made their case to the Copyright Royalty Board that Spotify, Apple, Google, Amazon and Pandora weren't paying songwriters enough when people streamed their compositions, a process that NMPA head David Israelite likened to "war." Those compositions, which are legally discrete from the recordings of those songs, are covered by "mechanical" licenses, a term that's roughly 100 years old and originally referred to the punch-card c

The world's most popular music streaming service, Spotify, went public today. Shares were expected to start trading around $130 each, but ranges for the opening price went as high as $169, and at the time of this writing its stocks were trading at $155, making the company worth about $27.4 billion. (You could safely expect these figures to fluctuate widely over the coming hours, days, weeks and months.)

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Enter before midnight on Sunday, April 15, 2018 to win tickets to see Beach House in concert on Saturday, May 5, 2018 at Cain's Ballroom in Tulsa.

Winners will be notified by email within a few days after the entry window closes. Official KOSU giveaway rules can be found here. Good luck!

**This contest has ended. Winners will be chosen and notified on Monday, April 16. Thank you!**

Following the mass shooting in Las Vegas last Oct. 1, which began while country star Jason Aldean was performing as the final act of the final night of the Route 91 Harvest Festival, another country singer who had played the event, Lee Brice, appeared on a local news station in South Carolina.

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