Zoe Travers

Student Reporter

Zoe Travers joined KOSU as a student reporter in June 2017. She is a mass communications student at Oklahoma City University.

She has worked as the news editor for MediaOCU, the OCU student newspaper, and has published several short stories and won state journalism awards for her opinion columns, movie reviews, and news stories.

Her interest in journalism began when she realized her love for writing could also be used to help people in her community.

She is very excited to be working with KOSU to learn more about public radio and inform people about issues that matter to them.

Ways to Connect

Zoe Travers / KOSU

One Oklahoma man is using his combined passion for martial arts and counseling to teach women how to help prevent sexual assault.

A recent study by the Center for Disease Control shows one in four women will experience an assault in her lifetime. There are resources for women available, but only a few focus on preventative care and instead offer treatment for coping.

CARE_SMC / FLICKR/CC BY-ND 2.0

Stephanie Henson admires her colorful backyard garden in Edmond. Approaching a pink-and-white plant, she squeals and laughs and she spots some butterflies.

“Oh look, they’re itty-bitty,” she says. “Look at ’em!”

Henson doesn’t know much about gardening, but she’s doing what she can to attract butterflies, which is what conservation specialists and government officials are trying to encourage here in Oklahoma and across the country.

Zoe Travers / KOSU

Darci Lynne is a 13-year-old Oklahoma ventriloquist who won the Golden Buzzer on America’s Got Talent back in May. When pressed, the Golden Buzzer advances the contestant straight to the live show.

The first live show will happen tonight, where Darci will compete against 11 other hopefuls.

Darci grew up watching America’s Got Talent, and it’s always been a dream of hers to win. She had a great time meeting the judges, and says winning the Golden Buzzer was totally unexpected.

Zoe Travers / KOSU

People who live in Oklahoma know the state’s weather is hard to predict. Erratic rain, heat and ice, and drought can also devastate government budgets. To combat this, researchers from the University of Oklahoma and Oklahoma State University are using new software to help cities predict these economic strains.

It’s a hot July day in Oklahoma, and everyone’s trying to cool off. Teenagers Seth Owens and Brandon Hansen are goofing off and singing country songs at Pelican Bay Aquatic Center in Edmond.

facebook.com/OKCThunder

A new basketball star is now in the Sooner State.

Four-time All-Star Paul George arrived at Will Rogers International Airport on Tuesday afternoon, and met with fans at The Jones Assembly on Wednesday night.

The 6'9" forward says he's excited about joining a team led by the NBA’s Most Valuable Player, Russell Westbrook.

facebook.com/RepMullin

Oklahoma U.S. Representative Markwayne Mullin is running for a fourth term, despite his campaign promise that he would only serve for three terms.

Mullin says his original decision was due to concerns about the impact of Congress on his family and their business, but now he says his family is doing well, and he has a better understanding of politics.

Mullin says he understands that people may be upset because he didn’t stand by his campaign promise, but he hopes to make a difference under President Trump’s administration.

okstate.edu

A new way to collect weather data is being tested this week.

Dozens of researchers from four universities—Oklahoma State University, the University of Oklahoma, the University of Kentucky, and the University of Nebraska—are piloting unmanned aerial vehicles as part of a four-year, $6 million project with the National Science Foundation.

But Dr. Jamey Jacob of Oklahoma State University says they’ve been interested in this idea for some time.

Flickr / dsledge

Four attorneys have filed a lawsuit over Oklahoma’s new drunk driving law, deeming it unconstitutional.

The lawsuit was filed Monday against Governor Mary Fallin, several state lawmakers, and Oklahoma’s public safety commissioner.

The lawsuit says the new law, which Fallin signed into law on June 8, violates the state Constitution’s ban on bills containing more than one subject.

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

The Trump Administration's recent budget proposal could mean bad news for Oklahoma farmers.

The proposal was introduced last month and, if passed, will reduce the U.S. Department of Agriculture budget by 21 percent.

This could result in higher rates for crop insurance, which could be detrimental to Oklahoma farmers as this farming season has already seen high levels of precipitation following a five-year drought.

Flickr / Wesley Fryer

A new ruling against the Federal Communications Commission is estimated to save the Oklahoma Department of Corrections $1.2 million dollars per year.

The case was decided Tuesday in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia.

Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter challenged the FCC’s ability to mandate rates for inmate phone calls within the state.

Removing that mandate means Oklahoma prisons and jails will be able charge more per phone call to cover the costs of monitoring inmate phone calls.

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