Ryan LaCroix

All Things Considered Host / Operations Director

Ryan LaCroix joined KOSU’s staff in 2013 after teaching for four years at ACM@UCO. He has been the co-host of The Oklahoma Rock Show since its inception in 2010. Ryan is also a contributing writer for Oklahoma Today magazine and the co-author of two books for the Oklahoma Historical Society. He has served on the Norman Music Alliance Board of Directors since 2013, the governing body of Norman Music Festival. He holds a B.A. in Journalism from the University of Oklahoma and lives in Blanchard with his wife and son.

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Ryan LaCroix, host of KOSU's All Things Considered and co-host of The Oklahoma Rock Show, shares his 25 favorite songs of 2016:

25. Thundercat ft. Michael McDonald & Kenny Loggins - "Show You The Way"

24. CLOSENESS - "More Romantic"

Ryan LaCroix, host of KOSU's All Things Considered and co-host of The Oklahoma Rock Show, shares his 10 favorite Oklahoma albums of 2017:

10. Mothica - Heavy Heart

LISTENSelf-Destructive, Sometimes, Out Of It

Last week, we counted down the top 25 Oklahoma songs of 2017. In total, we played 435 new songs on The Oklahoma Rock Show in 2017, so our final list was extremely competitive.

Check out our picks below.

25. St. Vincent - "Pills"

24. Gabriel Royal - "Say It's Right"

Casey Pierce/Courtesy of the artist

Each month, NPR Music asks our friends at public radio stations around the country for the songs they can't stop spinning. Whether it's a new song from a local artist or a band from the other side of the world, the mix is likely to include something you've never heard before.

November's playlist includes a song from an avant-garde Russian band with hints of new wave, a nostalgic country-folk song perfect for a campfire and a genre-blending song by a pair of 19-year-old producers.

Glintshake, 'Убожество'

From ОЭЩ МАГЗИУ

Photo Provided

Governor Mary Fallin has vetoed most of the latest budget bill, while keeping temporary funding intact  for the health and human services adversely affected when the cigarette fee was ruled unconstitutional.

Fallin announced the veto late Friday, after both legislative chambers had adjourned the special session. In a press release, she said she will be calling back lawmakers soon for a second special session.

Governor Mary Fallin says she's uncertain what she is going to do with the latest budget bill to cover the $215 million shortfall. She has said in the past she would veto any measure which makes cuts to state agencies and spends cash reserves.

With the latest budget fix, Fallin says lawmakers are kicking the can down the road.

Astrud Reed‎

Oklahoma musician Boyd Littell passed away on on Tuesday, October 31, following a bicycle accident in Portland, Oregon. He was 40.

Littell played in dozens of Oklahoma bands: ADDverse Effects, The Ills, Mama Sweet, Stereopimp, Scabby Itchins, Skinfonia, Pidgin, Thumpre, D-Lux Vortex, Conjunto Clave, The Method, The Projects, Blues Man/ Blues Devil, Tao Chemical, Tritones, Tincture, Blue Light Special, Lord High Octane & the Kam Shaft Kings, and several others.

Oklahoma State Senate

In the ongoing budget saga at the Oklahoma State Capitol, there was some bipartisan movement on Monday in the state Senate. Lawmakers have already agreed to increase the cigarette tax and fuel taxes, but the sticking point has been the gross production tax on oil and gas wells.

Last week, the House of Representatives passed a bill that would decrease the tax discounts on oil and gas wells after failing to come to another agreement. That bill only required a simple majority (51 percent) of lawmakers to vote in favor.

okhouse.gov

A Republican state Representative from Chickasha says he's resigning his seat immediately to reportedly take a job with the federal government.

Rep. Scott Biggs was first elected to office in 2012, and re-elected in 2016.

In his resignation letter, Biggs says his new post will be to promote Oklahoma's agriculture industry, but did not specify what job he will take.

"I believe I can do much more for our state as I work to promote the agriculture industry in Oklahoma, which has always been and will continue to be an integral part of my family's heritage."

A bill that moves approximately $23 million from the Rainy Day Fund to the state’s mental health agency is now heading to the governor's desk. It's the first bill to pass both chambers since the special legislative session began six weeks ago.

House Bill 1081X allocates $23.3 million from the fund to the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services.

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