Rachel Hubbard

Associate Director/General Manager

After three years as a part-time announcer at KTJS Radio in Hobart, Rachel Hubbard started her career at KOSU as a student reporter in 1999. Following graduation from Oklahoma State University, she served as KOSU’s state capitol reporter and news director. Today, in her role as associate director/general manager, Rachel continues to oversee the newsroom but also manages the day to day operations of the station. During her tenure at KOSU, Rachel has won national awards from the Public Radio News Directors Inc., and the Scripps Howard Foundation for her news coverage. She has also received numerous state and regional awards for news coverage and has been named to Oklahoma Magazine’s 40 under 40. Rachel loves to cook and is fond of non-traditional her non-traditional travel destinations including Timbuktu, Mali and a pygmy village in Uganda. She lives in Edmond with her husband Matt, stepsons Alex and Rafe and her two dogs, Oscar and Felix.

Ways to Connect

Common Core, high stakes testing, A to F grading of schools, teacher shortages… it’s hard to sort out what is going on in Oklahoma schools, and we’re in the middle of an election that is likely to change the direction again.  Join us for On Tap, where we’ll discuss with teachers, administrators and the Oklahoma Department of Education what has happened and what we can expect in our kids’ classrooms next.

The event starts at 6 p.m., Wednesday, August 27 at Picasso Café located at 3009 Paseo Street, Oklahoma City, OK 73103.

After a devastating tornado rolled through Moore, Okla., last May, firefighters were scrambling to pull people out of storm shelters. Actually finding those shelters, though, was difficult. Landmarks had been swept away, and the town's emergency dispatcher was overwhelmed with calls.

"Yes, we're at 604 South Classen. There's people down," one caller said. "We're stuck under rubble. ... Please hurry."

Shonn Neidel was one of the firefighters rushing to rescue people that day, and he quickly saw a problem.

One year ago Tuesday, a violent tornado obliterated the city of Moore, Okla., killing 24 residents and leaving nearly 400 injured among the razed homes and businesses. It was the third violent tornado to strike the city in the past 15 years. But rather than move away, residents have stayed put in Moore — and more and more are actually moving here.

Copyright 2017 KOSU-FM. To see more, visit KOSU-FM.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

On a Friday, it's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

Pages