Rachel Hubbard

Associate Director/General Manager

After three years as a part-time announcer at KTJS Radio in Hobart, Rachel Hubbard started her career at KOSU as a student reporter in 1999. Following graduation from Oklahoma State University, she served as KOSU’s state capitol reporter and news director. Today, in her role as associate director/general manager, Rachel continues to oversee the newsroom but also manages the day to day operations of the station. During her tenure at KOSU, Rachel has won national awards from the Public Radio News Directors Inc., and the Scripps Howard Foundation for her news coverage. She has also received numerous state and regional awards for news coverage and has been named to Oklahoma Magazine’s 40 under 40. Rachel loves to cook and is fond of non-traditional her non-traditional travel destinations including Timbuktu, Mali and a pygmy village in Uganda. She lives in Edmond with her husband Matt, stepsons Alex and Rafe and her two dogs, Oscar and Felix.

Ways to Connect

Rachel Hubbard / KOSU

Oklahoma is replacing the decks of playing cards they sell in the prison canteens with new custom decks featuring the faces of victims from 52 unsolved homicides and missing persons cases. Other states have similar programs and the program is working.

During the Iraq war, a surprisingly effective tool for the military was a deck of cards distributed to troops featuring the faces of Iraq’s most wanted. Now, law enforcement officials are hoping inmates in American prisons will help play a similar role in unsolved cases.

Allison Herrera

A case that helps determine whether or not the descendants of Cherokee slaves have the full citizenship rights of native Cherokees was decided in United States Federal District Court Wednesday.

After nearly three years, Senior U.S. District Judge Thomas Hogan in his ruling said the paramount question to be considered is whether an 1866 treaty between the Cherokee Nation and the United States granted the Cherokee Freedmen, or the descendants of slaves, "all the rights of native Cherokees."

It was a wild day at the state capitol as lawmakers tried to find new sources of revenue to fill the nearly $900 million budget shortfall and fund teacher pay raises. But, with just three days left to find new money, they’re likely back at the drawing board.

Starting about noon, there were rumors that a budget agreement had been reached between the Republican leaders in the House of Representatives and the Senate and Governor Mary Fallin. The scheduled an announcement for 2:30 p.m.

At least a dozen wildfires burning in Colorado, Texas, Kansas, Oklahoma and Florida have charred more than 1,700 square miles and remain largely uncontained.

Rachel Hubbard of member station KOSU in Oklahoma City, Okla., reported at least six people have died in the wildfires:

okhouse.gov

A bill that would change some of the criminal justice reforms voters approved in November advances in the legislature.

House Bill 1482 would again make it a felony to possess drugs within 1,000 feet of a school.

Rep. Tim Downing (R-Purcell) co-authored the bill and says it restores protection for children.

"A person can take heroin on an elementary school playground and do it an unlimited amount of times and essentially pay a ticket for it."

There’s an uproar in the small Oklahoma town of Henryetta after a Valentine's Day dance was canceled. The reason? It would have happened too close to a church.

Joni Insabella just wanted something fun to do in her hometown. She recently opened a vintage shop with an empty second floor. She decided it was good for one thing: dancing. So ,they started planning one for Valentine’s Day.

"We had not thought anything that very old 40-year-old city ordinance. It didn’t even cross our mind."

Thirty-three states have passed criminal justice reform in an attempt to reduce prison populations and save money.

But although voters in Oklahoma approved ballot initiatives enacting reforms in November, some lawmakers have filed bills to repeal the reforms.

Prisons in Oklahoma are at a 109 percent capacity, creating safety issues and budget problems. There's no money for treatment, and things are so dire, many inmates are sleeping in makeshift spaces like the cafeteria.

Rachel Hubbard / KOSU

The wounds for victims and family members of the OSU Homecoming Parade Crash are still raw. They gathered together on Tuesday to support each other on what was supposed to be the first day of the jury trial for Adacia Chambers, the woman accused.

Rumors had been swirling for more than a week that a plea deal was possible in the Adacia Chambers case, and instead of coming for a jury trial, dozens arrived ready to read victim impact statements about how those moments frozen in time last October still impact them every day.

Stillwater Police Department

Adacia Avery Chambers will spend the rest of her life in prison, under a plea deal accepted today at the Payne County Courthouse in Stillwater.

Chambers killed four spectators and injured dozens of others when she drove her car around a barricade and into a crowd during Oklahoma State University's homecoming parade on October 24, 2015.

Josh Robinson

Oklahomans might be holding on to their money leading up to the election. One researcher suspects people here may be even more anxious than voters than other states. 

The business at Dean’s Drive-Through Pawn Shop in south Oklahoma City is slower than it used to be. Brett Fisher's dad started the shop in 1968. Owning a business was never easy, but they did it as a family and still had time to ride dirt bikes together. Brett bought the business 23 years ago, and things have never been tougher.

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