Rachel Hubbard

Associate Director/General Manager

After three years as a part-time announcer at KTJS Radio in Hobart, Rachel Hubbard started her career at KOSU as a student reporter in 1999. Following graduation from Oklahoma State University, she served as KOSU’s state capitol reporter and news director. Today, in her role as associate director/general manager, Rachel continues to oversee the newsroom but also manages the day to day operations of the station. During her tenure at KOSU, Rachel has won national awards from the Public Radio News Directors Inc., and the Scripps Howard Foundation for her news coverage. She has also received numerous state and regional awards for news coverage and has been named to Oklahoma Magazine’s 40 under 40. Rachel loves to cook and is fond of non-traditional her non-traditional travel destinations including Timbuktu, Mali and a pygmy village in Uganda. She lives in Edmond with her husband Matt, stepsons Alex and Rafe and her two dogs, Oscar and Felix.

Ways To Connect

The sun hasn't been up long in Kingfisher, Okla., but it already feels like it's burning. Trucks are moving wheat as people try to get their work done early. It looks like business as usual for a hot summer day an hour northwest of Oklahoma City.

Henry Senn, Jim Willms and Bill Stolz come to CHS Plains Partners, the local grain elevator, just about every day to share stories from the good old days and talk about wheat prices.

Copyright 2015 KOSU-FM. To see more, visit http://www.kosu.org.



After months of development, the Oklahoma State Department of Education has released drafts of new proposed education standards

Everyone remembers exactly where they were when they found out about the Murrah Building bombing on April 19, 1995. It’s a moment frozen in time.

"I was in southeast London, I was directing a production of One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest at the ICA, and I was in a rehearsal and a friend of mine came in and said ‘you have to watch the television’," says Brian Parsons, the associate dean of Oklahoma City University’s School of Theatre.

But what do you do if you can’t remember? There’s now an entire generation of young 20-somethings who have no recollection of that day or the lessons learned. So, Parsons is using art to help.

"We didn’t want to recreate that day because that day doesn’t need recreating," he says. "We wanted to really show that out of evil and out of tragedy comes beauty and hope."

Flickr / katsrcool

Nearly 50 people have already contributed to the community story that will commemorate the 20th anniversary of the Oklahoma City bombing.  Some of the stories are haunting and really made us stop and think like this one from Lindsey Wilson

"I was 5 years old and was at Baptist Hospital.  We were there for a procedure for my dad.  I was in the elevator with my mother and grandparents.  I'll never forget when the elevator shook from the blast.  I remember looking up to my pawpaw and asking him what it was.  He just made something up like 'a helicopter landing'.  The next thing I remember is them moving my dad to a bed in the emergency room and looking out through the drapes as survivors were brought in.  The image of people with soot and blood all over them is etched in my memory." 

It was a horrific act of terrorism, and we want to honor our collective experience in a documentary.  Oklahoma Public Media Exchange partners including KOSU and KGOU are teaming up to present a comprehensive collection of stories to mark the anniversary.  We all remember exactly where we were that day, whether we were in high school or just sitting down to work.  We're looking to tell the community's story, especially stories that and untold or undertold?

Where were you that day?  Did you feel or see the detonation? Where were you when you heard the news? How were you called upon to help in the aftermath? How were you affected? Do you have a friend or neighbor who has an amazing story that tells the experience in a way that we all need to hear.

If you are willing to share your memories and stories from that day and the impact on your life, we'd like to hear from you. You can share your story on this specially dedicated site, and we may contact you later for more information.  We'll also be recording listeners' recollections on a specially dedicated phone line -- (405) 325-8700 -- and sharing them on the air and online. If you know someone with a story to tell, please encourage them to call, too.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.



On this first day of the legislative session, I would like to take a moment of personal privilege. Today, marks the end of an era, a passing of time few will probably notice but many should. It’s the first day Marie Price, the dean of the capitol press corps won’t be there to cover the chaos. She retired Friday.

Copyright 2015 KOSU-FM. To see more, visit http://www.kosu.org.



Beginning November 17, you may find yourself a little off kilter when you listen to Morning Edition.  We hear from many of you that you know you're late if you hear the local weather and you haven't reached a certain part in your commute or gotten your kids out the door.  Well, you might want to reset those clocks.

On Sunday, our partners at OETA hosted an analysis on last week's gubernatorial debate between Governor Mary Fallin and State Representative Joe Dorman.

Hosted by OETA's Dick Pryor, the Oklahoma Forum panel includes Rachel Hubbard of KOSU, Shawn Ashley of eCapitol, Rick Green of The Oklahoman, and Brandon Lenoir of Oklahoma State University.

The statewide general election takes place on Tuesday, November 4 and early voting begins Thursday, October 30. More information at ok.gov/elections.