Rachel Hubbard

Associate Director/General Manager

After three years as a part-time announcer at KTJS Radio in Hobart, Rachel Hubbard started her career at KOSU as a student reporter in 1999. Following graduation from Oklahoma State University, she served as KOSU’s state capitol reporter and news director. Today, in her role as associate director/general manager, Rachel continues to oversee the newsroom but also manages the day to day operations of the station. During her tenure at KOSU, Rachel has won national awards from the Public Radio News Directors Inc., and the Scripps Howard Foundation for her news coverage. She has also received numerous state and regional awards for news coverage and has been named to Oklahoma Magazine’s 40 under 40. Rachel loves to cook and is fond of non-traditional her non-traditional travel destinations including Timbuktu, Mali and a pygmy village in Uganda. She lives in Edmond with her husband Matt, stepsons Alex and Rafe and her two dogs, Oscar and Felix.

Survey
2:44 pm
Wed October 29, 2014

Changes for Morning Edition & All Things Considered

Beginning November 17, you may find yourself a little off kilter when you listen to Morning Edition.  We hear from many of you that you know you're late if you hear the local weather and you haven't reached a certain part in your commute or gotten your kids out the door.  Well, you might want to reset those clocks.  After nearly two years of research, NPR is changing the arrangement of Morning Edition and All Things Considered.  For the most part, this will mean minor shifts in where you hear newscasts and the places where we tell you the local weather and provide local news and events upda

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2014 Elections
1:08 pm
Tue October 7, 2014

Oklahoma Forum Recaps Gubernatorial Debate

On Sunday, our partners at OETA hosted an analysis on last week's gubernatorial debate between Governor Mary Fallin and State Representative Joe Dorman.

Hosted by OETA's Dick Pryor, the Oklahoma Forum panel includes Rachel Hubbard of KOSU, Shawn Ashley of eCapitol, Rick Green of The Oklahoman, and Brandon Lenoir of Oklahoma State University.

The statewide general election takes place on Tuesday, November 4 and early voting begins Thursday, October 30. More information at ok.gov/elections.

Same-Sex Marriage
8:30 am
Tue October 7, 2014

Same-Sex Couples Crowd Oklahoma County Court Clerk's Office to Get Married

Jennifer Hasler (left) and Karina Tittjung (right)
Rachel Hubbard

Same-sex couples across Oklahoma began to marry on Monday after the U.S. Supreme Court declined to take up appeals on several same-sex marriage rulings earlier in the day. That action caused the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals to lift a stay on their ruling against the ban on same-sex marriage in Oklahoma.

KOSU’s Ryan LaCroix reports on the couples that jumped at the chance to get married in Oklahoma County on Monday.

Roughly two dozen couples filtered into a crowded Oklahoma County Court Clerk’s office on Monday. Oklahoma County began issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples early Monday afternoon.

Mary Pavliska and her partner Brandie Hobia have been together since 2011 and are adopting a child together. Mary says although the day has been confusing, she’s happy with the end result.

“I called you about 9 a.m. and said ‘Let’s go!’ Then, we had to wait. Then, we had to wait longer, then I said, ‘Now, we’re really going. Apparently, it’s official now, so we’re going.’ I came to work a Pavliska and I’m leaving a Hobia, so I can’t really complain.”

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Education
11:02 am
Mon August 25, 2014

Where Did Education Standards Come From?

1983 Education Reform Report
Credit Creative Commons

Until recently, outside of education, no one really cared about education standards.  Few people outside of education really thought much about it before the Common Core controversy.  But where did these standards come from, and why do we have them?


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Education
11:18 am
Thu August 21, 2014

On Tap: What's Going On With Education in Oklahoma?

Common Core, high stakes testing, A to F grading of schools, teacher shortages… it’s hard to sort out what is going on in Oklahoma schools, and we’re in the middle of an election that is likely to change the direction again.  Join us for On Tap, where we’ll discuss with teachers, administrators and the Oklahoma Department of Education what has happened and what we can expect in our kids’ classrooms next.

The event starts at 6 p.m., Wednesday, August 27 at Picasso Café located at 3009 Paseo Street, Oklahoma City, OK 73103.

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All Tech Considered
5:19 pm
Wed May 21, 2014

Storm Shelter App Helps Pinpoint People Amid Tornado's Rubble

After a tornado leveled Moore, Okla., last year, firefighter Shonn Neidel (left) developed an app that helps first responders locate storm shelters under the wreckage.
Courtesy of Shonn Neidel

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 2:24 pm

After a devastating tornado rolled through Moore, Okla., last May, firefighters were scrambling to pull people out of storm shelters. Actually finding those shelters, though, was difficult. Landmarks had been swept away, and the town's emergency dispatcher was overwhelmed with calls.

"Yes, we're at 604 South Classen. There's people down," one caller said. "We're stuck under rubble. ... Please hurry."

Shonn Neidel was one of the firefighters rushing to rescue people that day, and he quickly saw a problem.

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Around the Nation
8:46 am
Tue May 20, 2014

Despite A History Of Twisters, Moore, Okla., Keeps Growing

Max Alvarez (left) and Hollan Corliss construct a new home in Moore, Okla., to replace one that was destroyed in May 2013. More than 300 new homes have been built since the tornado, in addition to the 1,100 that are being rebuilt.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 12:08 pm

One year ago Tuesday, a violent tornado obliterated the city of Moore, Okla., killing 24 residents and leaving nearly 400 injured among the razed homes and businesses. It was the third violent tornado to strike the city in the past 15 years. But rather than move away, residents have stayed put in Moore — and more and more are actually moving here.

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Around the Nation
9:27 am
Fri May 9, 2014

Oklahoma Delays Next Execution For 6 Months

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 3:26 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

On a Friday, it's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

The state of Oklahoma now has at least six more months to get to know Charles Warner. He's a man who was scheduled to die, is sentenced for a brutal crime. But the state attorney general agreed to a stay of execution. That gives the state time to investigate the way it puts people to death. The investigation follows the execution of Clayton Lockett, a proceeding that took 43 minutes and intensified debate over the death penalty.

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