Michael Cross

Morning Edition host

Michael Cross has been with KOSU since 2008, working as the state capitol bureau chief for seven years, as well as KOSU's student coordinator.  While he still keeps up with the capitol and does some reporting, his roles have changed.  As of October 2014, he's now the host of KOSU's Morning Edition.

He came to KOSU after several years in broadcast media, working at KTOK, KOKH Fox 25, KOCO Channel 5 and KWTV News 9. Michael has his degree in Broadcasting and Journalism from the University of Central Oklahoma as well as an Associates in Theatre Arts from Oklahoma City Community College. One of his hobbies includes performing on the stage having spent time with Oklahoma Shakespeare in the Park dating back to 1989.

Ways to Connect

This Week in Oklahoma Politics KOSU's Michael Cross talks to Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about an NPR and ProPublica report on the problems surrounding Oklahoma's opt out provision in its workers compensation system and the latest news on executions in the state.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the movement of the Ten Commandments monument of the State Capitol grounds and the news that the wrong drug was used in January to execute Charles Warner.

The trio also discuss the overturned blackmail conviction of former Sooner Tea Party leader Al Gerhart, the upcoming vote by Oklahoma City banning all activity in medians and the impact of Real ID on Oklahomans.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross holds a lengthy discussion with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the second stay of execution for Richard Glossip as well as the future of the Ten Commandments monument at the State Capitol.

The trio also discuss a plan by former Senator and Governor David Boren for a one cent sales tax to fund education and agency heads warned by legislative leaders to be ready for deeper cuts.

The Oklahoma City Council advances an ordinance to ban everyone from medians not just panhandlers.

The council heard from several citizens opposed to the measure like Derrek Jump, a veteran who advocates for homeless vets. Jump says he’s opposed to the idea of fining and jailing our poorest citizens.

"I think what it boils down to is extra revenue for our great city and the fact that we're willing to create revenue off the backs of our homeless population is absolutely reprehensible," says Jump.

This Land Press

When you think of Bluegrass music, you probably don’t think of Japan.

But, an article coming up in the fall issue of This Land Press focuses on the phenomenon of Japanese people playing and enjoying the Americana-style of music.

KOSU’s Michael Cross got a chance to talk to the author, Denis Gainty about the history of the genre and the nature of bluegrass music.

Denis Gainty teaches history as Associate Professor at Georgia State University.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Repulican Political Consultant Neva Hill about the visit to the Sooner State  by GOP Presidential candidates Donald Trump and Carly Fiorina, along with the latest attempts by attorneys for Richard Glossip to prove his innocence.

The trio also discuses three candidates looking to replace state Republican Party Chairman Randy Brogdon who resigned after just five months on the job and a bill possibly going before lawmakers next year to raise the pay of retired educators in an attempt to shore up the teacher shortage in the state.

The Sooner Stand Down by The Homeless Alliance taking place on Thursday from 6am to 4pm is entering its ninth year.

Executive Director Dan Straughan says the goal of the Stand Down is to help get veterans back on their feet.

The term “Stand Down” originated during World War I when soldiers were pulled back from the trenches for physical and mental respite.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, it's been an historic, tumultuous and also tragic summer as the dynamic duo has been away on vacation, but now ACLU Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill talk with KOSU's Michael Cross about their picks for the top stories of the past two months, but first, the discussion turns to the biggest news of the week: the resignation of Republican Party Chairman Randy Brogdon after just three months on the job.

The trio also discusses the issue of police seizing property from citizens and the next move for the Ten Commandments monument at the State Capitol.

Senator James Lankford / Facebook

U.S. Sen. James Lankford told business leaders in downtown Oklahoma City Thursday the country is going through a debate right now over whether it wants to governed by Washington, or the states.

“Will this be a nation that has a group of technocrats that are pretty smart people – there are some pretty smart folks in D.C. – that will really decide the policy for the nation?” Lankford asked. “Or will this be a nation that decisions are made close to the people that are affected by that decision?”

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