Michael Cross

Morning Edition host

Michael Cross has been with KOSU since 2008, working as the state capitol bureau chief for seven years, as well as KOSU's student coordinator.  While he still keeps up with the capitol and does some reporting, his roles have changed.  As of October 2014, he's now the host of KOSU's Morning Edition.

He came to KOSU after several years in broadcast media, working at KTOK, KOKH Fox 25, KOCO Channel 5 and KWTV News 9. Michael has his degree in Broadcasting and Journalism from the University of Central Oklahoma as well as an Associates in Theatre Arts from Oklahoma City Community College. One of his hobbies includes performing on the stage having spent time with Oklahoma Shakespeare in the Park dating back to 1989.

Ways to Connect

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about constitutional challenges against a state law to crackdown on drunk drivers and another to increase fees on a pack of cigarettes by a $1.50 and calls by the state's two biggest universities to ask for tuition increases in light of budget cuts from state lawmakers.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the annoucement by Tulsa Republican Senator Dan Newberry that he is resigning his seat effective next January or 2018, 17 Oklahomans sign up to run for election to two legislative seats & Governor Fallin signs the third and final bill to come out of the State Capitol to reform Oklahoma's correction system.

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The Oklahoma Department of Transportation is recalculating its eight year plan.

Director Mike Patterson says this comes after the legislature removed $150 million from the program which keeps work going on Oklahoma’s roads and bridges.

“Last year we had to reduce the eight-year plan by $323 million,” Patterson says. “These are cumulative numbers, and so, if you look over the last six to eight years, the impact has been $800 million.”  

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republlican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about how lawmakers did in the 2017 legislative session as they adjourned just before time ended last Friday, Governor Fallin gave her stamp of approval on the $6.8M budget for the next fiscal year, but the session ended without the passage of some of her issues on criminal justice reform which she promised during her State of the State.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the $6.8 Billion budget presented to lawmakers with just a few days left in the 2017 as well as the revenue bills getting passed to pay for the nearly $900M shortfall and the process of releasing the budget shortly before midnight on Tuesday.

The trio also the failure of lawmakers to pass a teacher pay raise bill and the Oklahoma Democratic Party elects possibly its youngest chair in 24-year-old Anna Langthorn.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill about lawmakers working to increase revenue to fill a nearly $900 million shortfall in the budget, the House welcomes its newest member who won a special election in District 28 & a bill gets amended to dramatically change civil lawsuits and no one noticed.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about a special election for a House seat which stays in Republican hands after the GOP gets a win in Seminole and Pottawatomie Counties, a $430M revenue bill stalls after a fight over expansion of tribal gaming and Governor Fallin reiterates her threat to veto a bill which just contains more cuts to already suffering state agencies.

Michael Cross / KOSU

Criminal justice reform supporters rally at the Capitol in a final push for bills to reduce prison populations.

The group Oklahomans for Criminal Justice Reform says about ten bills from the Governor's Justice Reform Initiative are still alive in conference committee and could pass before the end of session on May 26th.

Former House Speaker Kris Steele says fixing the broken justice system is absolutely a budget issue.

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Governor Mary Fallin says time is running out for the Oklahoma legislature to pass a budget.

Fallin says while the legislature ends on May 26th, any bills to raise revenue for the state have to be passed before the end of next week.

"We need to figure out a path forward. Not addressing the structure of the budget and just going ahead and cutting down to the bone, and then leaving, is not a plan. It's not a vision for the future."

She's calling on lawmakers to come up with a plan and reopen negotiations with her office.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the situation with the budget as lawmakers have just three weeks left in the session while the governor is threatening a special session and a deadline passes without a teacher raise making it through both chambers.

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