Michael Cross

Morning Edition host

Michael Cross has been with KOSU since 2008, working as the state capitol bureau chief for seven years, as well as KOSU's student coordinator.  While he still keeps up with the capitol and does some reporting, his roles have changed.  As of October 2014, he's now the host of KOSU's Morning Edition.

He came to KOSU after several years in broadcast media, working at KTOK, KOKH Fox 25, KOCO Channel 5 and KWTV News 9. Michael has his degree in Broadcasting and Journalism from the University of Central Oklahoma as well as an Associates in Theatre Arts from Oklahoma City Community College. One of his hobbies includes performing on the stage having spent time with Oklahoma Shakespeare in the Park dating back to 1989.

Ways to Connect

okhouse.gov

A Republican lawmaker from southeast Oklahoma who described a pregnant woman as a "host" is standing by his use of the term, saying his intent was not to offend anyone.

State Rep. Justin Humphrey of Atoka said Monday he didn't know of a better term to describe a pregnant woman and apologized to anyone who took offense.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill about Governor Fallin kicking off the 2017 legislative session with her Sate of the State Address and the next four months ahead for lawmakers as well as a a lawsuit against Attorney General Scott Pruitt over Oklahoma's Open Records Act.

A bill to get Oklahoma in compliance with the Federal Real ID Act moves on to the full House for consideration.

Rep. Leslie Osborn says House Bill 1845 creates a bifurcated system, meaning Oklahomans will have an option of getting a license which meets the standards of Homeland Security, or...

green-bambino.com

Local businesses are celebrating news that Amazon will start collecting sales tax from Oklahoma customers next month.

Morgan Harris, owner of Green Bambino, says this money is something which could go a long way to helping shore up some of the budget issues in Oklahoma.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill about the retirement announcement of Oklahoma County Sheriff John Whetsel amid an audit showing alleged mismanagement of funds at the county jail, President Trump's nominee for the U.S. Supreme Court Neil Gorsuch has ties to the Sooner State and U.S. Senate Republicans change the rules to avoid a Democratic boycott of Attorney General Scott Pruitt to head the Environmental Protection Agency.

facebook.com/OCSO911

Oklahoma County Sheriff John Whetsel is leaving after 20 years in office and shortly after starting his sixth term. Whetsel's retirement takes effect February 28.

Oklahoma City’s police department is making no changes to its immigration policy following President Trump’s executive order against sanctuary cities.

Police Chief Bill Citty says while Oklahoma City isn’t a sanctuary city, his officers are also not proactive in enforcing immigration laws because it can erode trust in a community.

oksenate.gov

Republican leaders in the Oklahoma Senate gathered Thursday for a press conference on their agenda for the coming legislative session.

Senate President Pro Tem Mike Schulz says the work of this session goes beyond just this year and looks to the future.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the passing of Oklahoma journalist and regular KOSU commentator Frosty Troy, the estimated 12,000 Oklahomans who participated in the Women's March at the State Capitol and Rep. Dan Kirby loses his chairmanship after refusing to talk with the House committee investigating him for sexual harassment.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill about the marathon congressional hearing by Attorney General Scott Pruitt to head the EPA, another accuser steps forward in the sexual harassment investigation of Tulsa Republican Rep. Dan Kirby while Stillwell Democratic Rep. Will Fourkiller refuses to participate in the closed door committee and the Governor's Justice Reform Task Force announces its recommendations could save the state $2B over the next ten years.

Pages