Michael Cross

Morning Edition host

Michael Cross has been with KOSU since 2008, working as the state capitol bureau chief for seven years, as well as KOSU's student coordinator.  While he still keeps up with the capitol and does some reporting, his roles have changed.  As of October 2014, he's now the host of KOSU's Morning Edition.

He came to KOSU after several years in broadcast media, working at KTOK, KOKH Fox 25, KOCO Channel 5 and KWTV News 9. Michael has his degree in Broadcasting and Journalism from the University of Central Oklahoma as well as an Associates in Theatre Arts from Oklahoma City Community College. One of his hobbies includes performing on the stage having spent time with Oklahoma Shakespeare in the Park dating back to 1989.

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On Tuesday, the Oklahoma City Council is expected to vote on an ordinance banning activities in city medians with an emphasis on ending panhandling.

KOSU's Michael Cross spoke with Homeless Alliance Executive Director Dan Straughan about what this means for Oklahoma City's indigent community.

 

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about Governor Fallin's call for the Oklahoma Health Department to cut funding to Planned Parenthood, the government waste report released by Oklahoma Senator James Lankford and a poll showing strong support by Oklahoma voters for school choice.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill about the attacks in Paris and calls by leaders, mostly Republicans who called on the President to stop allowing Syrian refugees into the country as well as opposition from a group including former Attorney General Drew Edmondson on the Right to Farm state question going before voters next November.

Comic book and pop cultural enthusiasts are descending on downtown Oklahoma City this weekend.

KOSU's Michael Cross got a chance to talk to the organizer of the Amazing Oklahoma City Comic Con, Jimmy Jay.

Find out more information at AmazingOklahomaCityComicCon.com.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about Governor Fallin facing calls for an investigation of possible interference in an investigation of a Tulsa doctor who also happened to be a donor to former Texas Governor Rick Perry and a lawsuit on an open records request that has taken a year and a half.

The trio also discuss a study giving Oklahoma an "F" in transparency and the appointment of a new Labor Commissioner.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill about Interim Studies at the State Capitol and Governor Fallin still waiting to pick a new Labor Commissioner to replace Mark Costello who was murdered several months ago.

The trio also discuss a lawsuit by the Sierra Club and other environmental groups against energy companies for their practice of using waste water for injection wells and Sapulpa Republican Representative Mark McCullough announces he is resigning.

Headlines for Monday, November 2, 2015:

  • New FCC rules could cost Oklahoma jails millions of dollars. (NewsOK)

  • The dispute over saltwater disposal wells is heating up. (Journal Record)

  • No more texting while driving in Oklahoma. (News9)

This Week in Oklahoma Politics KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about state agencies coming up with ways to cut 10% of their budget as ordered by Governor Fallin an Oklahomans on the Affordable Care Act seeing premium increase well above the national average at 37%.

The trio also new polling that shows support among Oklahomans for Presidential candidate Ben Carson and strong support for the death penalty.

Joe Shlabotnik / Flickr

A new state law makes changes to how child car seats are used.

Beginning on Sunday, children under the age of two must be in a rear facing car seat, the ages of 2-4 must be in a five point harness and the ages of 4-8 must be in a booster seat. Drivers in violation of the new law could be fined up to $50 for each offense.

KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Green Bambino owner Morgan Harris about the changes.

Harris says Oklahoma is one of the first states in the country to be providing these kinds of guidelines for parents.

A statewide ban on texting and driving takes effect November 1. Drivers can be pulled over for texting while driving and fined $100 after that date.

The Oklahoma Safety Council is working to raise awareness of the new law through employers and social media.

KOSU's Michael Cross got a chance to sit down with Executive Director Dave Koeneke about the campaign.

You can get more information including images for social media on the Oklahoma Safety Council Website.

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