Michael Cross

Morning Edition host

Michael Cross has been with KOSU since 2008, working as the state capitol bureau chief for seven years, as well as KOSU's student coordinator.  While he still keeps up with the capitol and does some reporting, his roles have changed.  As of October 2014, he's now the host of KOSU's Morning Edition.

He came to KOSU after several years in broadcast media, working at KTOK, KOKH Fox 25, KOCO Channel 5 and KWTV News 9. Michael has his degree in Broadcasting and Journalism from the University of Central Oklahoma as well as an Associates in Theatre Arts from Oklahoma City Community College. One of his hobbies includes performing on the stage having spent time with Oklahoma Shakespeare in the Park dating back to 1989.

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This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill about the $34M revenue failure facing state agencies as well as the $787M budget shortfall facing state lawmakers, Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett announces he will not seek a fifth term as leader of the state's capital city and lawmakers fast track a bill to get the state in compliance with the Federal Real ID Act.

Jacob McCleland / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

The Oklahoma Board of Equalization declared a revenue failure for the current fiscal year, which will result in mid-year appropriations cuts to state agencies.

State agencies will receive across board cuts of 0.7 percent between March and June of this year. In total, agencies will be cut by $34.6 million.

Preston Doerflinger, the Director and Secretary of Finance, Administration and Information Technology, said the situation is dire and more revenue is needed.

This Week in Oklahoma, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about a controversy and lawsuit against the newest member of the State Supreme Court, Patrick Wyrick, over discrepancies on his application to the high court, Lieutenant Governor Todd Lamb announces he's retiring from the Governor's cabinet over a disagreement on extending the state's sales tax to services and Republican Senator Ralph Shortey gets an earful from participants in a town hall he held to talk about his bills which would make changes t

okhouse.gov

A bill prohibiting abortions without the father’s approval passes out of House Committee.

Representative Justin Humphrey says he took the title off House Bill 1441 so it could be amended and go through the committee process. The Atoka Republican says he wants the bill to start the conversation of getting a father involved in the pregnancy.

"I'm proud that I've gotten a chance to start the conversation. Where the conversation ends, we're not sure."

okhouse.gov

A Republican lawmaker from southeast Oklahoma who described a pregnant woman as a "host" is standing by his use of the term, saying his intent was not to offend anyone.

State Rep. Justin Humphrey of Atoka said Monday he didn't know of a better term to describe a pregnant woman and apologized to anyone who took offense.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill about Governor Fallin kicking off the 2017 legislative session with her Sate of the State Address and the next four months ahead for lawmakers as well as a a lawsuit against Attorney General Scott Pruitt over Oklahoma's Open Records Act.

A bill to get Oklahoma in compliance with the Federal Real ID Act moves on to the full House for consideration.

Rep. Leslie Osborn says House Bill 1845 creates a bifurcated system, meaning Oklahomans will have an option of getting a license which meets the standards of Homeland Security, or...

green-bambino.com

Local businesses are celebrating news that Amazon will start collecting sales tax from Oklahoma customers next month.

Morgan Harris, owner of Green Bambino, says this money is something which could go a long way to helping shore up some of the budget issues in Oklahoma.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill about the retirement announcement of Oklahoma County Sheriff John Whetsel amid an audit showing alleged mismanagement of funds at the county jail, President Trump's nominee for the U.S. Supreme Court Neil Gorsuch has ties to the Sooner State and U.S. Senate Republicans change the rules to avoid a Democratic boycott of Attorney General Scott Pruitt to head the Environmental Protection Agency.

facebook.com/OCSO911

Oklahoma County Sheriff John Whetsel is leaving after 20 years in office and shortly after starting his sixth term. Whetsel's retirement takes effect February 28.

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