Michael Cross

Morning Edition host

Michael Cross has been with KOSU since 2008, working as the state capitol bureau chief for seven years, as well as KOSU's student coordinator.  While he still keeps up with the capitol and does some reporting, his roles have changed.  As of October 2014, he's now the host of KOSU's Morning Edition.

He came to KOSU after several years in broadcast media, working at KTOK, KOKH Fox 25, KOCO Channel 5 and KWTV News 9. Michael has his degree in Broadcasting and Journalism from the University of Central Oklahoma as well as an Associates in Theatre Arts from Oklahoma City Community College. One of his hobbies includes performing on the stage having spent time with Oklahoma Shakespeare in the Park dating back to 1989.

Ways to Connect

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Poltical Consultant Neva Hill and sitting in for Ryan Kiesel is Oklahoma City Democratic Representative Forrest Bennett about arguments before the state Supreme Court on a repeal of a tax paying for raises to teachers, school support staff and state workers and a new study places Oklahoma number one in the nation and number one for countries with a population of more than 500,000 in incarceration.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about a surge in independent voters ahead of the primary on June 26th as well as predictions on State Question 788 to legalize medical marijuana.

The trio also discusses a Republican forum in Tulsa's Congressional District 1 where one candidate shamed others in his party for not standing up to President Trump, especially his treatment of women.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill about a statement from the Attorney General's Office supporting a referendum petition to repeal a tax to pay for raises to teachers, school support staff and state workers while at the same time Attorney General Mike Hunter faces a heated primary against challenger Gentner Drummond over the airwaves.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Poltical Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about a grand jury investigation into the State Health Department finds reprehensible and inept practices leading officials to believe the agaency was insolvent and the subsequent layoff of nearly 200 people, boycotts and challenges are growing against a referendum petition to remove tax increases to pay for raises to teachers, school support staff and state workers as are questions of the validity of the petitions themselves and Tulsa Pub

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about Governor Fallin vetoing Senate Bill 1212 which would have allowed anyone over the age of 21 to carry a gun without a permit while signing Senate Bill 1140 allowing private adoption agencies to deny services to anyone based on religious preferences and the newly created and funded agency which will audit state agencies and decide how they should spend their money and which services to provide.

An LGBTQ group says the signing of a bill allowing for agencies to deny services on the basis of religion is disappointing, but not surprising.

Freedom Oklahoma Executive Director Troy Stevenson says Fallin’s signature on Senate Bill 1140 will make it harder for the 16,000 kids in state care to find homes.

He says he doesn’t understand the argument from supporters saying this will increase the number of agencies for kids to get adopted.

This week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican Poltical COnsultant Neva Hill about the 2018 legislative session ending three weeks ahead of schedule with several controversial bills heading to Governor Fallin's desk and the lawmakers might not be finished in this year.

The trio also discusses the numerous bills on the governor's desk, as well as the ones she has signed and the ones she has vetoed.

Oklahoma City Democratic Senator Kay Floyd has been selected as the minority leader for the next legislative session.

Sen. Floyd becomes the first woman in state history to lead a caucus in the Oklahoma State Senate when she takes the reins next year for the 57th legislature.

She says the Democrats have a large number of people running for Senate seats this year and hopes to see an increase in the minority party.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about an attempt by a group backed by former Senator Tom Coburn to veto the tax increases which are funding pay raises for teachers, support staff and state workers and lawmakers push through some questionable bills and leaves some on the table in its plan to end the 2018 legislative session three weeks early.

State lawmakers are staying on schedule to finish work three weeks ahead of schedule.

House Appropriations and Budget Chairman Kevin Wallace says the priority was to get the $7.6 billion budget to the Governor.

Wallace says getting it completed didn’t happen overnight as he’s been working on this budget for nearly a year.

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