Camila Domonoske

It's hot and dim inside this Comfort Inn just off the interstate in Fort Myers, Fla. The power has been off for two days, ever since the heart of Hurricane Irma passed right over the city.

But Dorothea Brown seems right at ease as she flips through a newspaper in the lobby.

In fact, she says the hotel is her "second home when we have to evacuate." Brown lives at a mobile home and RV park right along the Orange River, so evacuations are a part of life. She and her family and her neighbors have a routine.

"Every time there's a storm, we come here," she says.

As Hurricane Irma takes aim at Florida's west coast, some residents are tracking its trajectory from safer cities hours away from the projected path. Some are listening to the winds from shelters not far from their homes. But others are riding it out right underneath the storm.

The state of Florida ordered more than 6.5 million residents to evacuate large swaths of the southern part of the state and the Keys, underscoring Irma's enormous size and its deadly force, which already tore apart several Caribbean islands.

David Tang, Hong Kong-born socialite, entrepreneur, philanthropist and impresario, has died at 63.

The Financial Times — the British paper for which Tang wrote a weekly column — reported his death on Wednesday, writing that Tang died on Tuesday night in a London hospital. Tang had cancer, the paper notes.

Updated Thursday, Aug. 31 at 2:45 p.m. ET

As devastating floods continue across Houston and along the Texas coast, rescue teams have brought hope, heroism and much-needed relief to the stranded.

But help came too late for some. At least 29 people are confirmed to have died in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey and unprecedented flooding, and the death toll is expected to rise.

Weeks of flooding across Nepal, Bangladesh and India have killed more than 1,000 people, according to news agencies keeping track of official death tolls.

And while waters are receding in some areas, the monsoon season isn't over. A new round of flooding has brought life to a near standstill in Mumbai, India's financial center and one of the world's most populous cities.

Late summer often brings heavy rain, floods and landslides to the region, with deadly consequences.

The heir to the Red Bull fortune has been dodging Thai police for nearly five years — and Interpol has issued a new alert, calling for member nations to locate him and hand him over to authorities.

As Hurricane Harvey churned toward the Texas coast, Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner told people to stay put. Don't evacuate, he said. Ride out the storm.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott sounded a different note, telling Houstonians that if he were living in the area, he'd head north. "If you have the ability to evacuate and go someplace else for a little while, that would be good."

Local officials, in response, doubled down on their advice: Don't go.

Tobe Hooper, who directed the influential horror movie The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, died on Saturday in Los Angeles.

The LA County coroner's office confirmed the death to NPR, but did not provide a cause.

Hooper was a little-known, barely-funded filmmaker when he made the movie that echoed through the horror genre for years to come.

A judge in Washington, D.C., has approved a government request to access data from a website used to organize protests against President Trump's inauguration — with the caveat that the Department of Justice must establish "additional protections" to safeguard users' privacy and right to free speech.

You can swipe. You can scroll. But New Yorkers will no longer be able to flip through The Village Voice. This week, the legendary alternative weekly announced that it's ending its free paper version.

In a press release distributed Tuesday, the publication said it plans to maintain its digital platform and continue to host events but will no longer be printing paper copies. The Voice had been in print for more than six decades and recently had a distribution of some 120,000 copies each week.

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