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Doug Schwarz

Oklahomans won't vote until next year on whether to legalize medical marijuana, but a state lawmaker has already introduced legislation that would set the framework if sales of the drug are approved.

State Rep. Eric Proctor of Tulsa has introduced a measure that's nearly an exact replica of an Arkansas bill, where medical marijuana was legalized by voters last November.

The bill mirror's Arkansas' proposed plan, calling for a maximum $7,500 fee to apply to run a dispensary and a maximum $15,000 fee to apply for a marijuana cultivation license.

Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb is announcing his resignation from his position as Oklahoma's small business advocate on Gov. Mary Fallin's cabinet, citing a disagreement with Fallin over her plans to broaden the sales tax.

Lamb - who's considered a likely candidate for governor in 2018 - says he felt it was best to step aside from his cabinet post because he's unwilling to be an advocate for the tax proposals.

okhouse.gov

A Republican lawmaker from southeast Oklahoma who described a pregnant woman as a "host" is standing by his use of the term, saying his intent was not to offend anyone.

State Rep. Justin Humphrey of Atoka said Monday he didn't know of a better term to describe a pregnant woman and apologized to anyone who took offense.

The Oklahoma Democratic Party is challenging Gov. Mary Fallin's appointment to the state Supreme Court, saying he doesn't live in Supreme Court District 2 in southeastern Oklahoma.

The party released a statement Monday saying Fallin's selection of Solicitor General Patrick Wyrick to the state's highest court shows "a callous disregard for the Oklahoma Constitution."

Dave Newman / Shutterstock

Oklahoma lawmakers will be confronted by familiar issues when they convene the 2017 Oklahoma Legislature.

Leaders of the Republican-controlled House and Senate say they'll focus on their priorities when the four-month legislative session begins on Monday.

High on that list is coping with an $870 million state budget shortfall for the fiscal year that begins July 1. Republican Gov. Mary Fallin will call for "a major overhaul of our tax system" in her state-of-the-state speech to tap new revenue streams to help boost teacher pay and meet other needs.

okhouse.gov

An Oklahoma lawmaker who admitted asking a legislative aide to send him topless photos and accompany him to a strip club has announced his resignation, two days after a special House committee recommended he be expelled from office.

Republican Rep. Dan Kirby of Tulsa submitted a two sentence letter Saturday to House Speaker Charles McCall saying his resignation is irrevocable and takes effect March 1. A spokesman for McCall says the speaker received the letter and forwarded it to the governor.

green-bambino.com

Local businesses are celebrating news that Amazon will start collecting sales tax from Oklahoma customers next month.

Morgan Harris, owner of Green Bambino, says this money is something which could go a long way to helping shore up some of the budget issues in Oklahoma.

It didn't start out that way, but a new documentary tying various threads among far-right extremists and Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh serves as a history lesson and, indirectly, as a warning that something so horrible could happen again.

Tulsa County Jail

A Tulsa County district judge has denied a motion to dismiss a manslaughter charge against a white Tulsa police officer who fatally shot an unarmed black man last year.

Tulsa police officer Betty Jo Shelby was arraigned Wednesday in district court. She has pleaded not guilty to first-degree manslaughter in the September 16 death of Terence Crutcher.

After denying the dismissal motion and another motion for a new preliminary hearing, Judge Doug Drummond set a trial date of May 8.

An Oklahoma sheriff's agency where an ex-reserve deputy fatally shot an unarmed black man in 2015 is applying for a federal grant to outfit 50 of its deputies with body-worn cameras.

Tulsa County Sheriff Vic Regalado said Tuesday he's applying for a 50 percent match grant from the U.S. Department of Justice. The county would have to come up with roughly $50,000 of the equipment cost.

The agency comprising about 250 deputies will know by October if it received the grant. Regalado says deputies will begin field-testing the equipment in the fall.

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