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Karen Dalton: A Reluctant Voice, Rediscovered

Jul 12, 2008

Karen Dalton's new album, Green Rocky Road, was 45 years in the making.

The folk singer made the record at her cabin in Colorado with nothing but a 12-string guitar, a banjo and her voice. Joe Loop captured the recordings on a reel-to-reel tape deck in 1963.

"I can still see her in my mind, sitting in her rocking chair with that long-neck banjo, rocking back and forth playing," he says.

In her lifetime, Karen Dalton was anything but prolific: She recorded two albums, 1969's It's So Hard to Tell Who's Going to Love You the Best and 1971's In My Own Time, before spending the rest of her life avoiding the studio and sliding into drug abuse and poverty. Since her death in 1994, however, Dalton has experienced an unlikely resurgence in both popularity and prolificacy.

Oklahoma City Welcomes Shot at NBA Team

Apr 20, 2008

As basketball fans in Seattle try to find a way to keep the SuperSonics in their city, the Sooner State is gearing up to welcome the team to Oklahoma City.

Michael Cross reports for member station KOSU.

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Scandal Plagues Oral Roberts University

Nov 23, 2007

Oral Roberts University is in trouble. The Tulsa, Okla., school founded by evangelist Oral Roberts is the target of several lawsuits. The Christian university also says it is more than $50 million in debt.

And there are allegations that the university's current president, Richard Roberts, and his family spent university money for personal use. Roberts is the son of Oral Roberts.

Scott Gurian reports from member station KGOU in Norman, Okla.

A Half-Century Underground in Tulsa

Jun 15, 2007

Fifty years ago, the citizens of Tulsa, Okla., buried a 1957 Plymouth Belvedere in a vault, in what has to be one of the most interesting time capsules ever.

Mid-century historian and car nut Charles Phoenix has been driving with NPR's Steve Proffitt from Los Angeles to Tulsa to see the '57 Plymouth, which is finally being unearthed this Friday.

But already, those anticipating the car's unveiling have received disturbing news: The vault leaked, and over the years, the Plymouth was submerged in water.

A Journey Back to the Future

Jun 11, 2007

Ride along with mid-century maniac Charles Phoenix and NPR senior producer Steve Proffitt in our series "Destination: Time Capsule," a classic road trip with a twist.

Charles' 1961 mint green metallic Pontiac Bonneville coupe provides trustworthy transportation for a high-octane adventure from Los Angeles to Tulsa, Okla.

As a solo artist, Karen Dalton only recorded two albums (1969's It's So Hard To Tell Who's Going To Love You the Best and 1971's In My Own Time), and until recently, the latter remained primarily in the hands of a few obsessed vinyl collectors. Fortunately, some of those collectors include the likes of Devendra Banhart, who helped raise the late singer's profile in interviews and contributes an essay to a lavish new reissue of In My Own Time.

Karen Dalton (1938-1993) sang in a room-hushing confessional style, with a tone that earned her constant comparison with Billie Holiday. Part of the Greenwich Village folk scene in the early 1960s, Dalton hung out and performed with such luminaries as Fred Neil, the Holy Modal Rounders and Bob Dylan. Her debut, It's So Hard to Tell Who's Going to Love You the Best, was produced by Nik Venet, an executive and talent-spotter who produced Neil and helped launch Linda Ronstadt's first group the Stone Poneys.



The City Parks Board in Tulsa, Oklahoma, votes tomorrow on a controversial exhibit proposed for the city zoo that would describe the origins of the universe in biblical terms. The board is reconsidering an earlier vote to mount the exhibit at the zoo. As NPR's Greg Allen reports, the clash between science and religion is dividing many in Tulsa.

GREG ALLEN reporting: