News from NPR

­­­­­­American farms should be in full swing right now. But some farmers are running behind, waiting on work visas for planters and pickers from out of the country. The H-2A visa program is delayed for the third year in a row.

It sounds like the setup to a bad joke: A professor and a doctor walk onto a farm.

Kathleen Terrence, a pediatrician, kneels in an onion field outside Lisbon, N.Y., with a bunch of kids. As they prepare to plant some 30,000 onions, they're all taking tips from Mark Sturges — but he's no farmer, either. He's a literary critic.

For five days and five nights in February, NPR reporters Jason Beaubien and Kelly McEvers were "embedded" with Doctors Without Borders in the middle of nowhere. They were inside a massive United Nation's compound framed by earthen walls topped with razor wire. It's known as the POC — Protection of Civilians site. Heavily-armed U.N. peacekeepers patrol the perimeter of the compound; more than 120,000 civilians live there, seeking a safe haven in a war-torn country.

The EVE auction house in Paris is getting ready to sell off a collection of historical and highly controversial objects.

The collection notably includes a ceremonial war shield, masks, a shrunken head, a warrior jacket adorned with human scalps, ancient jewelry, and ceremonial stones. Most of the collection can be traced back to Native American Indian tribes including the Acoma Pueblo and the Hopi.

US laws prohibit the sale of Native American ceremonial items, but those don’t apply in France.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Researchers are developing a system to teach robots how to feel pain.

The would-be Bernie Sanders vs. Donald Trump throwdown will only live on in the minds of comedy writers.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

A handful of companies are offering parental benefits that go way beyond just paid leave, to include things like surrogacy reimbursement, egg freezing or breast milk shipping for traveling mothers.

As competition for talent heats up, companies see it as a relatively cheap way to recruit, retain and motivate their employee base.

Labels for the first long-acting opioid addiction treatment device are rolling off printing machines Friday. Trainings begin Saturday for doctors who want to learn to insert four matchstick-size rods under the skin. They contain the drug buprenorphine, which staves off opioid cravings.

The implant, called Probuphine, was approved by the Food and Drug Administration on Thursday, and is expected to be available to patients by the end of June.

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Carlos Barria/Reuters

President Barack Obama's visit to Hiroshima and the trip immediately preceding it, to Vietnam, have powerful and historic symbolism. And for Americans who served in Vietnam, and the dwindling band of World War II veterans, the visits have special significance.

We were curious, too, to find out how veterans of more recent US wars were reacting. We reached out to our online veteran community and asked them: "What's your reaction to Obama's Vietnam and Hiroshima trip? And how much do World War II and the Vietnam War shape your worldview?"

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