News from NPR

Pages

Environment
4:20 pm
Mon October 20, 2014

Why Are The Great Lakes On The Rise?

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 6:03 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Middle East
4:20 pm
Mon October 20, 2014

Turkey Opens Border For Iraqis Seeking To Fight ISIS

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 6:03 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Book News & Features
4:20 pm
Mon October 20, 2014

'Lila' Sets The Stage For Marilynn Robinson's Earlier Works

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 6:03 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Music Articles
4:20 pm
Mon October 20, 2014

Jessie Ware On Learning To Trust Herself

"I didn't know that it was going to be my career," Jessie Ware says. Her new album is titled Tough Love.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue October 21, 2014 10:41 am

Read more
Shots - Health News
4:16 pm
Mon October 20, 2014

Parkinson's Drugs Can Be A Gateway To Sin

Drugs that are commonly prescribed to help people cope with Parkinson's disease have been linked to bizarre changes in behavior that patients and doctors should be on guard against, researchers say.

The disturbing side effects include compulsive gambling, uncontrollable shopping and a sudden obsession with sex.

Read more
The Salt
3:53 pm
Mon October 20, 2014

Climate Change Has Coffee Growers In Haiti Seeking Higher Ground

A Haitian woman holds cherries from a coffee tree. Haiti's coffee trade was once a flourishing industry, but it has been crippled by decades of deforestation, political chaos and now, climate change.
Patrick Farrell MCT /Landov

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 6:57 pm

Haiti once produced half the world's coffee. The lush, shade-covered mountainsides provided an ideal environment for imported Arabica trees.

Today, Haitian coffee barely registers in global surveys. Trade embargoes, deforestation and the rise of global coffee powerhouses such as Brazil and Indonesia are just a few of the reasons. And now, there's climate change.

Read more
The Salt
3:41 pm
Mon October 20, 2014

Sandwich Monday: The Primanti Bros. Pitts-burger

It's smiling at you. I guess it doesn't know what's about to happen.
NPR

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 5:35 pm

If you do a regular blog post about sandwiches, you will frequently hear from people telling you to try Primanti Bros. in Pittsburgh, or that the sandwich you just ate is a ripoff of something Primanti Bros. has been doing for years. Also, if you do a regular blog post about sandwiches, you probably regularly hear from your parents wanting to know what on earth you went to college for.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:36 pm
Mon October 20, 2014

Judge Says 1,000 Potential Jurors May Be Screened For Boston Bombing Trial

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.
Handout Getty Images

A judge in Boston says that some 1,000 pre-trial jurors may be asked to complete a questionnaire for the trial of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev in January.

The Boston Herald reports U.S. District Court Judge George O'Toole Jr. made the announcement at a status conference on Monday.

The Herald adds:

Read more
Shots - Health News
2:48 pm
Mon October 20, 2014

Eye Phone? Your Next Eye Exam Might Be Done With Your Phone

Smartphones can now capture high-quality images of the front and back of an eye.
Courtesy of David Myung

Originally published on Tue October 21, 2014 10:54 am

Getting an eye exam typically involves big complicated machines. But eye doctors are trying to get the big and complicated out of the equation by using smartphones and tablets instead. That way, they figure, eye exams can be done just about anywhere — even a village in Nepal.

Read more
Parallels
1:59 pm
Mon October 20, 2014

The Artificial Boundary That Divides Iraq

A family passes through Maktab Khaled in northern Iraq, the last Kurdish checkpoint before they make their way to Kirkuk. ISIS-controlled territory lies less than a mile away.
Leila Fadel NPR

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 6:03 pm

Standing at the top of a dirt and gravel hill, past the sand-filled barriers that enclose a small base of Kurdish forces, a soldier looks through binoculars. One bridge and a body of water separate them from the so-called Islamic State or ISIS.

"Just across the river, under the bridge there is the checkpoint of ISIS," the soldier says.

We're at a checkpoint called Maktab Khaled about 12 miles south of Kirkuk, the disputed and oil-rich city in northern Iraq.

Read more

Pages