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The Two-Way
7:34 am
Tue June 30, 2015

Dozens Dead In Indonesia Air Force Plane Crash

Military personnel remove an aircraft wheel at the site where an air force cargo plane crashed in Medan, Indonesia, on Tuesday.
Dedy Zulkifli AP

Originally published on Tue June 30, 2015 12:23 pm

Updated at 12:22 p.m. ET

Dozens of people are dead after an Indonesian air force C-130 Hercules transport plane crashed into a residential area in Medan, the country's third-largest city, shortly after takeoff Tuesday. An Indonesian military spokesman put the toll at 74.

Air force spokesman Rear Marshal Dwi Badarmanto said 74 bodies were recovered from the crash site. The dead included air force personnel and their relatives, he said.

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It's All Politics
6:57 am
Tue June 30, 2015

Congress Leaves For Recess Without Reauthorizing Export-Import Bank

Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew (center) speaks with (from left) Sen. Ben Cardin, D-Md., Ellicott Dredges GM Craig Murdock and CFO Joseph Wendel during a tour of the company's manufacturing facility in March. Lew was on hand to promote investment in American infrastructure. The company has utilized the Export-Import Bank's services.
Patrick Semansky AP

Originally published on Tue June 30, 2015 3:40 pm

An agency of the federal government will have to stop doing business today. That's because members of Congress went home last week for the July Fourth recess without reauthorizing the Export-Import Bank.

The bank helps American companies sell their goods overseas. The bank's critics say they're stopping corporate welfare.

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Code Switch
4:58 am
Tue June 30, 2015

Making The Law Respect Gender Identity After Death

Filmmaker Christopher Lee attends a 1999 film festival.
Elizabeth Sheldon Courtesy of Elizabeth Sheldon

Originally published on Tue June 30, 2015 11:04 am

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Parallels
4:58 am
Tue June 30, 2015

Would You Buy A Used Car From A Man Named Beer Horse?

NPR's Frank Langfitt has been offering free taxi rides around Shanghai to talk to ordinary Chinese. He drives a Camry around the city, but rented a van for a trip 500 miles outside the city earlier this year. He recently decided to buy a car, which can be a complicated process in China.
Yang Zhuo for NPR

Originally published on Tue June 30, 2015 4:46 pm

I'd been renting a Toyota Camry to give free rides around the city for my series Streets of Shanghai, about the lives of ordinary Chinese. But the monthly rental fees were killing me, so I figured I could save money by buying a used car.

I went to a reputable used car dealership. The first hint that this would be different than shopping in the U.S. came when I met my salesman, a fresh college grad.

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Law
4:58 am
Tue June 30, 2015

Supreme Court Concludes Term With Death Penalty Ruling, Looks Ahead

The gurney in the the execution chamber at the Oklahoma State Penitentiary in McAlester, Okla. On Monday the Supreme Court voted 5-4 in a case from Oklahoma that the sedative midazolam can be used in executions without violating the prohibition on cruel and unusual punishment.
Sue Ogrocki AP

Originally published on Tue June 30, 2015 1:52 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday issued the last of its opinions for this term — on the death penalty, anti-pollution regulations and the power of independent commissions to draw congressional and state legislative districts. In addition, the court issued a set of orders that set up cases to be heard next term on affirmative action and abortion.

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Latin America
4:58 am
Tue June 30, 2015

Brazil Tries To Rebuild Relations With U.S. After NSA Spying Scandal

President Barack Obama walks with Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff, second from right, during a visit to the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington, D.C., on Monday.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Tue June 30, 2015 8:06 am

It's rare that a world leader will cancel a planned state visit to the White House, but that's what happened two years ago when Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff found out that the U.S. had been spying on her and her top aides.

The Brazilian leader is now trying to let bygones be bygones, and is in Washington, D.C., to visit with President Obama.

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Heavy Rotation
2:03 am
Tue June 30, 2015

Heavy Rotation: 10 Songs Public Radio Can't Stop Playing

With his catchy songwriting and rock-star stage presence, BØRNS grabbed WNKU's attention.
Nick Walker Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue June 30, 2015 4:03 pm

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Music
12:03 am
Tue June 30, 2015

The Complete List: NPR Music's Favorite Songs Of 2015 (So Far)

Originally published on Tue June 30, 2015 3:45 pm

The story of music in 2015 goes like this: There are endless ways to listen to endless songs. Looking for something new? There's an algorithm for that. Prefer a human touch? Podcasts, blogs, Beats 1 (maybe!), good old terrestrial radio — take your pick. Honestly, we use all these and more. Many of these songs came to us via Soundcloud or YouTube, Spotify or iTunes. Many others showed up in our inboxes and demanded attention. Some of them we'd been waiting for for years. Some were complete surprises.

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All Tech Considered
7:09 pm
Mon June 29, 2015

Apple Bets Big That You'll Start Paying To Stream Music

Apple's senior vice president of Internet Software and Services Eddy Cue speaks about Apple Music during the keynote at the annual developers conference.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 29, 2015 7:30 pm

Spotify, Google Play, Amazon Prime, Rdio, Rhapsody, Pandora — the list of streaming music service goes on and on. On Tuesday, Apple joins that lineup with the launch of its streaming service, Apple Music. Apple will give consumers a three-month trial, and then it will charge $9.99 a month.

But most music lovers still aren't sure why they should pay. Colin Barrett, 31, has tried a few of the streaming services, but he doesn't use them anymore.

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It's All Politics
7:02 pm
Mon June 29, 2015

Lethal Injection Ruling Draws Out Justices' Passionate Opinions

In dissent, Justice Sonia Sotomayor wrote that under the majority's reasoning it would not matter if the prisoner was being "drawn and quartered, slowly tortured to death, or actually burned at the stake," as long as there was no more humane method of execution available. Justice Antonin Scalia orally rebutted Justice Stephen Breyer's dissent, calling it "gobbledygook."
Carolyn Kaster AP

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday dealt a major blow to death penalty opponents, upholding the use of a controversial drug as part of a three-drug execution cocktail. The vote was 5-4, with unusually passionate and sometimes bitter opinions from the majority and dissenting justices.

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