Law
4:55 pm
Wed January 11, 2012

Court Strikes Down Oklahoma Shariah Ban

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

A federal appeals court has struck down Oklahoma's ban on Sharia law. The ruling said the state amendment, which was passed in 2010, discriminated against Muslims.

NPR's Barbara Bradley Hagerty reports.

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Best Music Of 2011
3:53 pm
Tue January 3, 2012

The Year In Garage Rock: 5 Favorites For 2011

Thee Oh Sees.
Courtesy of the artist.

Garage rock has undergone a serious rejuvenation in recent memory. Over the last few years, bands like The Black Keys and Best Coast have surfaced in the mainstream, and as a result, garage-rock artists that might have gone unnoticed less than a decade ago are now landing major attention (see: Thee Oh Sees and Black Lips).

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It's All Politics
7:12 pm
Wed December 14, 2011

Just How Many Jobs Would The Keystone Pipeline Create?

Demonstrators march with a replica of a pipeline during a protest to demand a stop to the Keystone XL tar sands oil pipeline outside the White House last November.
Evan Vucci AP

One of the major sticking points between the House and the Senate as they face off over end-of-year legislation is the controversial Keystone XL pipeline. The bill the House passed Tuesday contains a provision forcing President Obama to decide on the pipeline within 60 days.

Republicans say this project should move ahead quickly because it will create thousands of jobs. But just how many jobs would be created is a matter of contention.

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Poisoned Places: Toxic Air, Neglected Communities
1:55 pm
Thu November 10, 2011

Oklahoma Town Battles Powdery Carbon Pollution

The Continental Carbon plant sits on the southern outskirts of Ponca City, Okla. Residents blamed the plant, which produces a black dust known as carbon black, for polluting their city.
David Gilkey NPR

Part 2 of a four-part series, Poisoned Places: Toxic Air, Neglected Communities

Karen Howe couldn't believe her luck. As a single mom working a minimum-wage job and living with two kids in a crowded one-bedroom apartment in Ponca City, Okla., she was desperate for a three-bedroom house and a lawn.

Howe, a member of the Ponca tribe, was offered tribal housing in a small, tree-lined subdivision of 11 homes on the southern, rural edge of the city.

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Sports
9:22 am
Tue November 8, 2011

Some Local Businesses Hurting Without NBA Assist

Oklahoma City Thunder forward Kevin Durant (left) and Miami Heat forward LeBron James warm up before an NBA charity basketball invitational game in Oklahoma City on Oct. 23. The NBA had a series of exhibition games to keep players in the spotlight during the lockout. The lockout is hurting local businesses and arena employees in Oklahoma City.
Sue Ogrocki AP

From Los Angeles to New York City and Miami to Dallas, professional basketball fans face November without the NBA. The league keeps canceling games because of the ongoing lockout as players and owners squabble over future contracts.

Most NBA cities have other professional sports to turn to with hoops on hiatus. But some markets, like downtown Oklahoma City, only have one game in town.

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Around the Nation
11:28 am
Tue August 16, 2011

Heat, Drought Pressure Oklahoma's Water Supplies

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin talks about the state's response to the drought during a news conference Monday in Oklahoma City. At right is state Emergency Management Director Albert Ashwood.
Sue Ogrocki AP

It's been so hot and dry this summer that climatologists say the southern part of the United States is going through an "exceptional drought."

Parts of Oklahoma have seen little rain since October — not to mention a string of 100-degree days. The steamy conditions are pressuring the state's water needs.

About 1.2 million people live in the Oklahoma City metropolitan area, and they are putting a drain on the city's water supplies.

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The Two-Way
6:22 pm
Thu July 14, 2011

Parts Of U.S. Emerge From Wave Of Scorching Heat

As Florida temperatures hover in the 90's, boys use a swing rope to cool off in the Suwannee River near Chiefland, Fla.
Phil Sandlin AP

America's South, Midwest and Southwest are suffering through drought and high heat. Those regions have braved a string of days that saw temperatures in the high 90s, with heat indexes commonly reaching above 110 degrees.

But forecasters say much of the eastern U.S. will experience a gradual cool-down in the next few days. "New York and the D.C. area will drop down intothe lower 80s by Friday," the AP said, "while Atlanta drops to the upper 80s Friday and Saturday."

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US News
5:53 pm
Tue March 29, 2011

WikiLeaks Suspect Manning: A Troubled Home Life

Before his arrest last year, Manning was reportedly involved in several altercations while serving in the Army.
Frontline

Before he was in the national spotlight, Bradley Manning, the Army intelligence analyst who now faces charges of giving classified material to WikiLeaks, was an isolated young man with a troubled family life, according to Frontline correspondent Martin Smith.

In a profile of the jailed soldier for Frontline, Smith conducted extensive interviews with Manning's family and friends. Smith says his goal was to explore Manning's life before his arrest last summer.

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It's All Politics
3:51 pm
Fri March 11, 2011

Obama Effort To Counter GOP On Gas Prices, Budget Overtaken By Japan

President Obama at a news conference, March 11, 2011.
Alex Wong Getty Images

President Obama's Friday news conference, which reporters were informed of the day earlier, was initially intended to give him a chance to respond to increasing Republican attacks on his energy policy.

With rising gas prices in recent weeks as the backdrop, Republicans have charged that his administration's restrictions on domestic oil production were keeping gas prices higher than they'd be otherwise.

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Religion
7:47 pm
Wed November 10, 2010

Oklahoma's Anti-Shariah Law Put On Hold, For Now

Election board inspector Pat Cook places an "I Voted" sticker on a voter during early voting in Oklahoma City late last month.
Sue Ogrocki AP

A federal judge on Monday temporarily stopped Oklahoma's new anti-Shariah law from taking effect.

Oklahoma's law -- a ballot initiative approved by 70 percent of Oklahomans in the Nov. 2 elections -- would change the state constitution to prohibit courts from considering international or Muslim law when deciding cases.

Muneer Awad, head of the Oklahoma chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations, wasn't surprised at the Nov. 2 vote -- but he was sad and worried.

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