Interviews
10:28 am
Sun May 18, 2014

A First Black Professor Remembers Her Segregated Education

Hortense McClinton graduated from Howard University in Washington, D.C., in the 1930s and became the first black professor at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill.
Courtesy of Howard University

Originally published on Sat May 24, 2014 4:25 pm

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Hortense McClinton has lived with a remarkable sense of determination — for 95 years.

Her father's parents were slaves, and McClinton grew up in a completely segregated society, the all-black town of Boley, Okla.

"I didn't realize how segregated everything was," she tells NPR's Lynn Neary. That changed after a visit with her uncle in Guthrie, Okla.

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It's All Politics
5:30 am
Sun May 18, 2014

Do We Need This Government Agency? 'Let Me Google That'

Sen. Tom Coburn, R-Okla., is a longtime deficit hawk, releasing an annual Wastebook that points a critical finger at billions of dollars in questionable government spending.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 11:48 am

Why would anyone pay for something when the exact same thing is available for free? The answer seems obvious, yet the question remains relevant for an obscure federal agency still pursuing its Cold War mission in the age of the search engine.

Say you wanted to know more about supersonic retro-propulsion wind tunnel testing. Or ancient land use in the Maya Lowlands. Or a 1996 hazardous waste characteristics scoping study. OK, you don't really want to know about these things, but someone did, and someone did the research.

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3:44 pm
Sat May 17, 2014

Parched: A New Dust Bowl Forms in the Heartland

Lead in text: 
National Geographic looks at the Oklahoma panhandle and asks, "Are we having another Dust Bowl?"
Four years into an unrelentingly mean, hot drought, a new Dust Bowl engulfs the same region that was the geographic heart of the original.
Local News
6:57 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

Okla. Sheriff's Tweets Among Most Popular In US

Credit twitter.com/OkCountySheriff

Oklahoma County's sheriff wants basketball fans and the Oklahoma City Thunder to know that streaking is illegal — but cheering, loudly, for the NBA team has yet to land anyone in the local jail.

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Reading, Crumbling Capitol, Prisons and Parody
8:40 am
Fri May 16, 2014

Gov. Faces Decision on Third Grade Retention Bill

This Week in Oklahoma Politics KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the governor choosing to sign or veto a bill bringing parents and educators into the decision of reading retention for 3rd graders, concrete is falling into offices at the State Capitol, the governor approves a $13M supplemental for the Department of Corrections and the co-founder of the Sooner Tea Party creates a parody website poking fun at the senator he's accused of blackmailing.

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Homestand Prepares People for Tornadoes
7:40 am
Fri May 16, 2014

New Store for Oklahoma Storm Season

A store dedicated to helping people prepare for emergencies opens just in time for the upcoming tornado season.

Located in Oklahoma City, the Homestand Preparation Station is the first of its kind with potential for more locations and partnerships in the future.

KOSU’s Maude Garrett reports the store goes beyond simply preparing for the next natural disaster.

Walking into Homestand Preparation Station the store is quiet, organized, and peaceful, the opposite of what you would experience after one of Oklahoma's infamous tornadoes.

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Literature and Television
10:03 am
Thu May 15, 2014

Author of "Longmire" Book Series Set to Visit OKC

Credit Craig Johnson / https://twitter.com/ucrosspop25

A New York Times best-selling author and originator of the A&E network’s highest-rated series makes a stop in Oklahoma City next week.

KOSU’s Nikole Robinson Carroll has details.

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StateImpact Oklahoma
7:44 am
Thu May 15, 2014

Drought and Passive Landowners Add Fuel to Oklahoma’s Burning Red Cedar Problem

Billy Hays in the cab of a Bobcat, which Oklahoma County modified to cut and shred Eastern Red Cedars.
Credit Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

The eastern red cedar tree causes allergies, crowds out other species, guzzles water, and fuels Oklahoma’s most devastating wildfires, including one near Guthrie last week. And lengthy drought has intensified the problem. But as StateImpact’s Logan Layden reports, eliminating the tree is complicated by the passive attitude of many landowners, and a state forestry service with little authority.  

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The Two-Way
7:44 am
Wed May 14, 2014

Manning Could Move To Civilian Prison For Hormone Therapy

PVt. Chelsea Manning, formerly named Bradley, was convicted last year of sending classified documents to anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks. In this 2010 photo, Manning was dressed as a woman. The soldier has asked for hormone therapy and to be able to live as a woman.
U.S. Army handout Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 1:25 pm

The Pentagon is working on a prison transfer for convicted WikiLeaks source Pvt. Chelsea Manning, who has requested hormone therapy. The plan would allow Manning to serve time in a civilian prison, where such therapy is available.

Manning's first name was Bradley when the soldier made headlines for sending a trove of classified documents to the anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks.

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A Major Come From Behind Game Five
7:40 am
Wed May 14, 2014

Thunder Win Big in This Week's Sports Talk

Sportscaster and journalist Brent Weber talks to KOSU's Michael Cross about the come from behind victory in game five, 105 to 104 as well as the other NBA game, Indiana Pacers losing at home to the Washington Wizards, 102-79.

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