Language and Tech Create New Opportunities for Revitilization

Many native languages are considered endangered, ­with few first speakers left to pass down the language to a new generation. But...as Invisible Nations’ Allison Herrera tells us, a new generation of young people fueled by technology​ is making an impact. The famed song by Chubby Checker encouraging dancers all over to get down and, “Do the Twist” plays in the background as dancers from the Cherokee Pride school in NE Oklahoma move and groove around. Today, the song isn't being sung by the...
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WATCH: Herman Lookout On Revitalizing The Osage Language

Herman "Mogri" Lookout is the master language teacher for the Osage Nation in Pawhuska, Oklahoma. He's studied the language for forty years and helped revitalize the written portion of it by creating an orthography. Language teachers and experts from all over Native America say that an orthography is a way to reclaim your sovereignty. Lookout also worked with developers to create Osage for Unicode. Because of that, Osages all over the world can write and text in the language. He says...
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Tuesday was technically Donald Trump's night — he officially received the party's presidential nomination — but as it went on, the speakers at the Republican National Convention homed in on his rival, Hillary Clinton, and not what he would do as president.

Headlines for Wednesday, July 20, 2016:

  • Oklahoma gives Donald Trump 24 of its 43 delegates toward nomination. (Tulsa World)

  • Citizens raise concerns over recent decisions by the Oklahoma City Police Department. (KOSU)

Larry Lamsa / Flickr

The U.S. government has announced it is removing the lesser prairie chicken from a federal protection list under the Endangered Species Act.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said Tuesday the move follows recent court rulings in Texas that stripped the lesser prairie chicken of federal protection. However, federal officials say the removal didn't mean authorities had concluded the lesser prairie chicken didn't warrant federal protection for biological reasons.

Flickr / _candid_

Citizens are raising concerns about recent decisions by the Oklahoma City Police Department.

Rev. T. Sheri Dickerson, a Black Lives Matter Organizer, says she’s worried a move by the police to allow officers to carry their personal rifles ends the wrong message to the community.

Gov. Mary Fallin spoke briefly during Monday’s opening of the Republican National Convention. Fallin serves as one of the co-chairs of the GOP’s platform committee, and says the party’s principles can change the way people think, and the direction of the country.

Headlines for Tuesday, July 19, 2016:

  • The state’s high court keeps a penny sales tax for education on the November ballot. (Tulsa World)

  • Oklahoma City police are getting to carry their own weapon on patrol. (NewsOK)

Emily Wendler / KOSU

After months of debate, the Oklahoma City Public School Board voted to expand KIPP Charter Schools at Monday night’s board meeting. But the expansion will not go as originally planned.

KIPP currently runs a middle school out of F.D. Moon Academy, and has been fighting to extend their rigorous academic model within the district. The charter school proposed starting an elementary school in Martin Luther King Jr. Elementary and hoped to share space with Douglass High School as well. However, Superintendent Aurora Lora says a task force will do more research to decide the locations.

It's a warm and muggy summer afternoon in Chicago, but that doesn't seem to bother the kids clamoring to ride the Ferris wheel, the Rock-O-Plane and other carnival rides set up in this southwest suburban park.

At the annual Chicago Fraternal Order of Police summer picnic, city cops and their families hauled in coolers and set up grills to enjoy food and bond with brothers and sisters in blue.

But there's something hanging over this picnic: the stress and strain of the job, and the scrutiny that many here say is harsher than ever.

Mark J. Terrill / AP

Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett described success by GOP municipal leaders during the first day of the Republican National Convention Monday afternoon in Cleveland.

Cornett said Republicans hold the top jobs from San Diego to Miami, including Oklahoma’s two largest cities. He said Republicans have held the Oklahoma City mayor’s seat for 29 consecutive years.

Sue Ogrocki / AP

Oklahoma City Police Chief Bill Citty says he's reconsidered his previous position and now will allow officers to carry their personal rifles while on duty until the department buys additional weapons.

Citty told reporters Monday that he changed his mind after three officers were shot and killed in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

Last week, Citty rejected the city's Fraternal Order of Police request to allow officers to carry personal rifles following the shooting deaths of five Dallas officers.

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KOSU's Michael Cross talks about political news in Oklahoma with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican political consultant Neva Hill.

Education News

Emily Wendler / KOSU

After months of debate, the Oklahoma City Public School Board voted to expand KIPP Charter Schools at Monday night’s board meeting. But the expansion will not go as originally planned.

KIPP currently runs a middle school out of F.D. Moon Academy, and has been fighting to extend their rigorous academic model within the district. The charter school proposed starting an elementary school in Martin Luther King Jr. Elementary and hoped to share space with Douglass High School as well. However, Superintendent Aurora Lora says a task force will do more research to decide the locations.

Emily Wendler / KOSU

Oklahoma City Public Schools is still looking to fill more than 100 teaching positions before classes begin just two weeks from now on August 1.

District officials say they’re actively recruiting, and are partnering with the State Department of Education to find emergency certified teachers.

Here's a list of available positions.

Emily Wendler / KOSU

Oklahoma City Public Schools recently released a more detailed breakdown of its massive budget cuts. This breakdown was presented to principals during a “Back to School” meeting, and shows specifically how cuts could affect students next school year.

The district’s fine arts budget will be slashed by 50 percent, for a total reduction of $195,000. This will impact supplies and transportation expenses. District officials say they will focus reductions on transportation expenses, in order to retain fine arts supplies in the classrooms.

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