How The NRA Uses Its Political Clout: An Early Lesson In Oklahoma

There was a time when the National Rifle Association was known primarily for promoting gun safety and advocating for gun ownership for hunting and home protection. But that seems a long time ago. It still does those things, to be sure, but these days the NRA is far more recognizable as an uncompromising political force, aggressively defending its interpretation of the 2nd Amendment, while working to defeat any and all politicians it views as its enemy. It's a transition that took place over...

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Updated at 12:30 p.m. ET

The Trump administration will scuttle an Obama-era clean power plan aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

The administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, Scott Pruitt, made the announcement in Hazard, Ky., on Monday, saying the rule hurt coal-fired plants.

"The EPA and no federal agency should ever use its authority to say to you we are going to declare war on any sector of our economy," Pruitt said, speaking at an event with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky.

How An Oklahoma Drug Court Rehab Kept Its Participants' Workers' Comp

Oct 9, 2017
Shane Bevel / Reveal

After Fred Barbee broke his ankle while working at a chicken processing plant in Arkansas, he expected time off to heal.

But he wasn’t in a normal workplace. A drug court judge in Tulsa, Oklahoma, had sent Barbee to a drug rehabilitation program called Christian Alcoholics & Addicts in Recovery, or CAAIR. The program makes men work without pay at plants owned by Simmons Foods Inc.

Headlines for Monday, October 9, 2017:

  • Lawmakers won’t be resuming the special session today. (NewsOK)

  • Repairs at the State Capitol could mean more delays in the Special Session. (Journal Record)

  • Midwest City residents are heading to the polls tomorrow to vote on a sales tax increase. (NewsOK)

Headlines for Friday, October 6, 2017:

  • House Dems put pressure on Republicans while unveiling a solution to fix the budget. (Tulsa World)

cole.house.gov

House Republicans said they will consider restrictions on bump stock gun accessories. Steve Inskeep talks with Republican Rep. Tom Cole of Oklahoma about his position.

TRANSCRIPT:

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about a call by the House Majority Floor Leader for Republican Representatives to report to the State Capital to resume the special session this Monday afternoon, the State Supreme Court rejecting a portion of the 2013 Workers Compensation Overhaul removing benefits from workers who miss two or more medical appointments and Scott Pruitt gets criticized for spending nearly $15,000 in one days worth of air travel across Oklahoma.

Emily Wendler / KOSU

Polls suggest this is one of the the most politically divided moments in American history. There are now tip sheets on how to survive Thanksgiving without disowning your family, and the comment sections of online news articles are full of vitriol.

Schools are not immune to the tension, but not everyone thinks that’s a bad thing.

How Bump Stocks Make Guns Fire Faster

Oct 5, 2017

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Headlines for Thursday, October 5, 2017:

  • An Oklahoma woman shot during the Las Vegas massacre won’t undergo surgery. (NewsOK)

  • Oklahoma man arrested for threatening a Las Vegas style shooting. (AP)

They Thought They Were Going To Rehab. They Ended Up In Chicken Plants

Oct 4, 2017
Gabriel Hongsdusit / Reveal

The worst day of Brad McGahey's life was the day a judge decided to spare him from prison.

McGahey was 23 with dreams of making it big in rodeo, maybe starring in his own reality TV show. With a 1.5 GPA, he'd barely graduated from high school. He had two kids and mounting child support debt. Then he got busted for buying a stolen horse trailer, fell behind on court fines and blew off his probation officer.

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KOSU's Michael Cross talks about political news in Oklahoma with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican political consultant Neva Hill.

Education News

We're doing things by the numbers this week in our weekly roundup of all things education.

167 of 1,113 public schools in Puerto Rico are open

Soon-to-be-released statewide test scores are expected to be much lower than they were in the past, but top education officials say the drop is due to a more difficult grading system, not poor-performing students.

State Superintendent of Public Instruction Joy Hofmeister says the state has a new way of measuring student proficiency.

“This has been a time of recalibrating,” she said in an interview after a press conference held with reporters to explain the declining scores.

 

Emily Wendler / KOSU

Polls suggest this is one of the the most politically divided moments in American history. There are now tip sheets on how to survive Thanksgiving without disowning your family, and the comment sections of online news articles are full of vitriol.

Schools are not immune to the tension, but not everyone thinks that’s a bad thing.

More Education News
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