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Grand Jury: Financial Crisis at Oklahoma Health Agency Never Existed

The six-month investigation into financial mismanagement at the Oklahoma State Department of Health is complete — and no criminal charges will be filed. A grand jury started probing the agency in November after officials reported a sudden budget shortfall. The resulting financial crisis led to the layoffs of nearly 200 employees and an emergency infusion from lawmakers of $30 million to help the agency stay solvent. The grand jury said the financial crisis wasn’t real. The grand jury blamed...

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The Russia Investigations: Big Questions Answered, More Big Questions Raised

Updated at 9:44 a.m. This week in the Russia investigations: The Senate Judiciary Committee dumps documents about the 2016 Trump Tower meeting, the special counsel's office celebrates its first birthday and the GOP escalates its war against the Justice Department. The enemy within After chapters on "wiretaps," eavesdropping, "unmasking" and the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, the new hotness this week was confidential sources. FBI investigators used a confidential source in the initial...

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8 Students, 2 Teachers Killed In Santa Fe High School Shooting

Updated 8:47 a.m. ET After the chaos of a deadly school shooting, parents, relatives and friends scramble to find their loved ones, while authorities set about the work of providing medical attention to the wounded and identifying the bodies of those who are killed. Eight students and two teachers died during the 15-minute assault at Santa Fe High School in Texas on Friday. Thirteen others were wounded in the worst school shooting since 17 people were killed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High...

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Nick Oxford for NPR

On Monday night, the Oklahoma City Public School board approved new names for three schools originally named after Confederate Civil War generals.

An LGBTQ group says the signing of a bill allowing for agencies to deny services on the basis of religion is disappointing, but not surprising.

Freedom Oklahoma Executive Director Troy Stevenson says Fallin’s signature on Senate Bill 1140 will make it harder for the 16,000 kids in state care to find homes.

He says he doesn’t understand the argument from supporters saying this will increase the number of agencies for kids to get adopted.

Updated at 3 p.m. ET

Tens of thousands of Palestinians are protesting the opening of the new U.S. Embassy in Jerusalem, and Israeli army forces have killed 55 protesters, according to the Gaza Health Ministry. The ministry also says some 2,770 people have been hurt in demonstrations and clashes.

Sherry Young just wanted to be able to walk without pain.

About three years ago, she began to experience sharp pain in her left foot. Her big toe had become crooked and constantly rubbed up against the adjacent toe, making it painful to run, walk or even stand. "I could not walk without intense pain unless I had a pad underneath my toes for cushioning," Young said.

An orthopedic surgeon told her that he could fix her problem for good. "He thought my foot was hitting the ground too hard and causing pain," said Young. "That's what he was trying to correct."

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin managed to anger both gun-rights and LGBTQ-rights activists late Friday with two separate actions.

In a rare blow to the National Rifle Association, Fallin vetoed a bill that would have loosened gun laws in the conservative state. Had it passed, SB 1212 would have allowed gun owners to carry a firearm — either open or concealed, loaded or unloaded — without a state license or permit. About a dozen states have passed similar so-called "constitutional carry" laws.

Emily Wendler / StateImpact Oklahoma

George Wang, a senior at the Oklahoma School of Science and Mathematics, recently made a discovery that disrupts a fundamental theory in chemistry.

He’s modest, and little shy about his finding, but Fazlur Rahman, his chemistry teacher at the high school in Oklahoma City, is ecstatic.

“It’s a wonderful feeling, isn’t it?” Rahman said. “That’s cool!”

George’s discovery came about because his teacher asked him to think outside the box.

Rahman was teaching about the Carbon atom, and its natural tendency to form four bonds, which he says is basic chemistry.

This week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican Poltical COnsultant Neva Hill about the 2018 legislative session ending three weeks ahead of schedule with several controversial bills heading to Governor Fallin's desk and the lawmakers might not be finished in this year.

The trio also discusses the numerous bills on the governor's desk, as well as the ones she has signed and the ones she has vetoed.

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Latest News From StateImpact Oklahoma

Education News

Nick Oxford for NPR

On Monday night, the Oklahoma City Public School board approved new names for three schools originally named after Confederate Civil War generals.

Emily Wendler / StateImpact Oklahoma

George Wang, a senior at the Oklahoma School of Science and Mathematics, recently made a discovery that disrupts a fundamental theory in chemistry.

He’s modest, and little shy about his finding, but Fazlur Rahman, his chemistry teacher at the high school in Oklahoma City, is ecstatic.

“It’s a wonderful feeling, isn’t it?” Rahman said. “That’s cool!”

George’s discovery came about because his teacher asked him to think outside the box.

Rahman was teaching about the Carbon atom, and its natural tendency to form four bonds, which he says is basic chemistry.

This week in our roundup, we travel from Arizona to the United Kingdom to the Philippines to bring you the education news.

Teachers in Arizona head back to class

More Education News
KOSU's Michael Cross talks about political news in Oklahoma with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican political consultant Neva Hill.

A weekly two-hour show of Oklahoma music, from across the state. The show opens a window of Oklahoma music to the rest of the world.

Weeknights with Ferris

Hear Ferris O'Brien every weeknight, from 7 p.m. to midnight, on The Spy.