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Thunder Acquire Joffrey Lauvergne From Nuggets

The Denver Nuggets traded forward Joffrey Lauvergne to the Oklahoma City Thunder on Tuesday for two second-round draft picks in 2017. Lauvergne, a native of France, appeared in 83 games for the Nuggets, including 16 starts, averaging 6.7 points and 4.4 rebounds. He was the 55th pick in the 2013 NBA draft and made his debut for Denver late in the 2014-15 season. With the move, ESPN's Royce Young predicts the Thunder to clear the log jam at power forward in a possible trade for a small forward....
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Ryan LaCroix / KOSU

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt has cleared craft brewers in the state to sell full-strength beer for consumption on the premises.

Pruitt issued the opinion Tuesday after the state's Alcoholic Beverage Laws Enforcement Commission asked him to review a new state law that allows the sale of full-strength beer.

Emily Wendler / KOSU

Oklahoma City Public School Board members approved a $180 million dollar bond proposal at a special board meeting on Tuesday. The bond will not increase taxes, and instead extends a bond that is set to expire.

Superintendent Aurora Lora said Oklahoma City Public Schools has dire basic needs throughout the district, and the new bond will address transportation, technology, and building maintenance issues.

KOSU is continuing its 60th year of radio broadcasting in 2016, and I am proud to have been part of this station for more than a third of that time. As station director during past nine years, I have been privileged to stand alongside a great team of public radio professionals and listener financial partners to preserve and grow KOSU’s media services.

Headlines for Tuesday, August 23, 2016:

  • Five things you should know about voting today. (Oklahoma Watch)

  • More than 6,000 Oklahomans participate in early voting in runoffs. (NewsOK)

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The lineup for November’s general election ballot will be settled after candidates in one congressional and 13 legislative races face off Tuesday.

The run-off elections will feature the top two vote earners from the June primaries in races where no candidate received at least 50 percent of the votes.  

Districts in much of the state won’t vote because their legislative and congressional match-ups for the general election have already been set.

Here are five things to keep in mind about Tuesday’s elections:

Republican Races Dominate

Emily Wendler / KOSU

A new statewide survey found that at least 2,800 public school jobs have been lost to budget cuts this year.

The survey, conducted by The Oklahoma State School Board Association, showed that 1,500 of those jobs lost were teaching positions and 1,300 were support staff.

The OSSBA conducted the survey during the first two weeks of August. Districts representing about 83 percent of the state’s public school enrollment participated.

Other survey results show:

twitter.com/GovMaryFallin

Every Oklahoma motorist will pay an additional $5 beginning later this month for a new license plate that features the outline of the state bird - a scissortail flycatcher - on a blue background.

Gov. Mary Fallin unveiled the new license plate during a press conference with state officials on Monday. The new plates cost the state about $2.05 to produce. Most of the additional revenue will go into a newly created State Public Safety Fund that will be available for the Legislature to spend to "support public safety" in the state.

facebook.com/SpokiesOKC

Oklahoma City’s bike sharing program, Spokies OKC announces new upgrades to its bicycle sharing experience.

Program Manager Jeanne Smith says cyclists in last week’s Full Moon Bike Ride at the Myriad Gardens got a chance to view the new bicycles.

"The new bikes are more durable than the previous bikes. They also have GPS, so that we can locate the bikes."

The $304,000 in upgrades include new bike seats which are easier to adjust, front and rear hand brakes, and splash guards for a cleaner ride.

Voters in Norman will decide on a stormwater plan Tuesday that would increase residents’ monthly utility bills. The city says the additional revenue will help deal with runoff created by heavy rainfall and property damage from flooding.

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Programming Changes Coming to KOSU

KOSU is continuing its 60th year of radio broadcasting in 2016, and I am proud to have been part of this station for more than a third of that time. As station director during past nine years, I have been privileged to stand alongside a great team of public radio professionals and listener financial partners to preserve and grow KOSU’s media services. Together, we expanded KOSU’s weekday national news programming, strengthened local news content through collaborations such as StateImpact and...
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KOSU's Michael Cross talks about political news in Oklahoma with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican political consultant Neva Hill.

Education News

Oklahoma City Public Schools

At the Oklahoma City Public School Board meeting on Monday night, the president of the teacher’s union, Ed Allen, called for one board member to step down, at least momentarily.

Allen believes board member Gloria Torres could have been involved in enrollment fraud at the Oklahoma City Community College, where she is the director of Community Outreach and Education.

According to The Oklahoman, two OCCC employees for Torres’s department were suspended with pay on August 11.

Emily Wendler / KOSU

Oklahoma City Public School Board members approved a $180 million dollar bond proposal at a special board meeting on Tuesday. The bond will not increase taxes, and instead extends a bond that is set to expire.

Superintendent Aurora Lora said Oklahoma City Public Schools has dire basic needs throughout the district, and the new bond will address transportation, technology, and building maintenance issues.

Emily Wendler / KOSU

A new statewide survey found that at least 2,800 public school jobs have been lost to budget cuts this year.

The survey, conducted by The Oklahoma State School Board Association, showed that 1,500 of those jobs lost were teaching positions and 1,300 were support staff.

The OSSBA conducted the survey during the first two weeks of August. Districts representing about 83 percent of the state’s public school enrollment participated.

Other survey results show:

More Education News
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