Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

What Scientists Say A Warming Climate Might Mean For Oklahoma

A new report from hundreds of experts and more than a dozen federal agencies is stark: Humans are likely responsible for the warmest period in modern civilization. The consequences of this warming vary regionally, but scientists and researchers forecast significant effects in Oklahoma and other southern plains states. The National Climate Assessment is the U.S. government’s most authoritative statement on climate change. The first part of the updated report, released in November 2017,...

Read More

Updated at 2:32 p.m. ET

Garrison Keillor, the creator and former host of A Prairie Home Companion, has been accused of inappropriate behavior with someone who worked with him, according to Minnesota Public Radio, which has announced it is cutting ties with Keillor and his production company.

Headlines for Wednesday, November 29, 2017:

  • Bixby School faces a Friday deadline over investigation in football player rape. (Tulsa World)

  • Congressman Cole calls out President Trump’s "Pocahontas" comments. (NewsOK)

Special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian election interference has passed the six-month mark, and President Trump's staff is painting a picture of a process nearing its end.

"We still expect this to conclude soon," White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders has told reporters.

Updated at 3 a.m. ET on Wednesday

North Korean state media say the country has launched a new type of intercontinental ballistic missile called the Hwasong-15. The statement says the missile is North Korea's most powerful ever and can reach all of the United States.

Earlier the Pentagon's initial assessment said the missile was an ICBM, the third tested by North Korea.

KOSU listeners will hear a new show beginning this weekend, as the storytelling show Snap Judgment will air from 2 to 3 p.m. on Saturdays.

Headlines for Tuesday, November 28, 2017:

  • Tax overhaul questions arise for Lankford in “Federal Fumbles” release. (Tulsa World)

  • Far-right lawmakers are unmoved by Governor’s executive orders. (Journal Record)

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

A watchdog group is suing two state officials to force them to hand over documents related to corruption allegations at the Tar Creek Superfund site in northeastern Oklahoma.

Washington, D.C.-based Campaign for Accountability requested documents related to a 2011 investigation of the Lead-Impacted Communities Relocation Trust, a public trust set up with government money to buy contaminated properties and relocate residents near the abandoned lead and zinc mine.

Casey Pierce/Courtesy of the artist

Each month, NPR Music asks our friends at public radio stations around the country for the songs they can't stop spinning. Whether it's a new song from a local artist or a band from the other side of the world, the mix is likely to include something you've never heard before.

November's playlist includes a song from an avant-garde Russian band with hints of new wave, a nostalgic country-folk song perfect for a campfire and a genre-blending song by a pair of 19-year-old producers.

Glintshake, 'Убожество'

From ОЭЩ МАГЗИУ

Headlines for Monday, November 27, 2017:

  • Lawmakers wait to see if the governor calls them back into special session this week. (Tulsa World)

Governor Mary Fallin issued an executive order Tuesday directing the State Board of Education to consolidate some school district administrations.

First, Fallin wants the State Board of Education to compile a list of school districts that spend less than 60 percent of their budget on classroom instruction.

Pages

KOSU's Michael Cross talks about political news in Oklahoma with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican political consultant Neva Hill.

Education News

Emily Wendler / KOSU

Education leaders in Oklahoma say Gov. Mary Fallin’s executive order on school consolidation oversimplified a very complicated issue.

The November 21 order directs school districts that don’t spend at least 60 percent of their budget on instruction to consolidate administrative staff with other districts. A strict interpretation of this rule would force most Oklahoma school districts to cut an administrator, or a support staff person, and then find a way to split that cost with a neighboring district.

CENTER ON BUDGET AND POLICY PRIORITIES

A new report shows Oklahoma's per-pupil education funding has dropped more over the last decade than any other state.

The report says Oklahoma’s per-pupil school funding has decreased by 28 percent since 2008. In other words: the state is spending about $1,000 dollars, per-child, less than it did 10 years ago.

Governor Mary Fallin issued an executive order Tuesday directing the State Board of Education to consolidate some school district administrations.

First, Fallin wants the State Board of Education to compile a list of school districts that spend less than 60 percent of their budget on classroom instruction.

More Education News
A weekly two-hour show of Oklahoma music, from across the state. The show opens a window of Oklahoma music to the rest of the world.