Rachel Star Withers runs a YouTube channel where she performs goofy stunts on camera and talks about her schizophrenia.

Since 2008, when the then 22-year-old revealed her diagnosis online, tens of thousands of people have seen her videos. Some of them have a psychotic disorder or mood disorders themselves, or know people who do.

"Look at someone like this guy right here," Alex Taub says, intently peering at his laptop screen.

We're in Taub's office right off Union Square in New York City. It's the headquarters of SocialRank, the startup he co-founded. SocialRank shows companies and public figures with brands to promote which of their followers on Twitter and Instagram are most valuable.

Taub's pulled up his own Twitter account to show me one of his own followers, someone who seems valuable.

There's a battle brewing between Facebook and the people who make professional videos on YouTube. Facebook has made video a priority over the past year and many of the most popular videos turn out to have originated on YouTube.

A lot of YouTube stars say Facebook is taking money right out of their pockets — and many of them are talking about big money.

LOOKatOKC pop music columnist Matt Carney joins host Ryan LaCroix every week to discuss music news and new music releases during All Things Considered on KOSU.

This week, we talk about new music from alternative R&B/pop musician How To Dress Well, the YouTube fight with independent labels and the lovely sounds of Zola Jesus.
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The long-haired, bearded vocalist known as Smooth McGroove arranges, performs and produces a capella renditions of classic video game tracks, from Final Fantasy to Street Fighter.  He has more than 814,000 subscribers on YouTube to show for it.  KOSU's Nikole Robinson Carroll spoke with him about his process, his background… and his cat.

You can follow Smooth McGroove on YouTube and Twitter.