women in politics

On a Saturday morning in December, Kate Coyne-McCoy stood before 26 women in a small conference room in Manchester, N.H., explaining what fires her up in the morning.

"I wake up every day, the first thing I do is look at this list of members of Congress that I have, and I figure out who's sick and who's going to die," Coyne-McCoy told the women. "Because I want to replace them with you."

Women are more enthusiastic than men about the idea of a Trump impeachment, according to the Public Religion Research Institute. Nearly half of women — 47 percent — believe President Trump should be impeached, compared with 32 percent of men.

Will the election of Donald Trump, who once boasted of grabbing women by the genitalia and has a history of sexist remarks, create a wave of female candidates at all levels of government in the coming years?

Early signs from the groups that work with women considering a bid for office suggest a level of intense interest not seen in at least a quarter century.

Kate Noble had never considered getting involved in politics until she woke up the day after Trump's surprise victory over Hillary Clinton.

Women's March: Red State Women Took to the Streets, Too

Jan 23, 2017
Courtesy of Guest

On Saturday, more than a million people attended women’s marches across the country, including some 500,000 people who marched in Washington, D.C. Crowd sizes exceeded initial expectations, and sister marchers around the world reportedly drew up to 2 million demonstrators. 

As The Takeaway broadcasts from public station KOSU in Oklahoma, Ellen Pogemiller who marched in Oklahoma City over the weekend with her mother and aunt, discusses her experience. Pogemiller says everyone was overwhelmed by the level of support they received.


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Updated at 4 p.m. ET

The National Mall has flooded with pink, as demonstrators descend on the nation's capital Saturday for the Women's March on Washington. Just one day after President Trump's inauguration, marchers from across the country have gathered in the city to protest his agenda and support for women's rights.

The event opened with a rally, to be followed by the march proper — which had a path laid out from a starting position near the U.S. Capitol to its endpoint near the Washington Monument.


Women, already underrepresented in the state Legislature, will hold fewer seats in 2017 despite a surge in the number of female candidates this year.

Those results, coupled with Hillary Clinton’s failed bid to become the first woman president, have left many women in Oklahoma feeling that their representation in politics has been dealt a blow.

The cemetery where women's suffrage activist Susan B. Anthony is buried extended its hours Tuesday "to accommodate those wishing to celebrate their vote" at her gravesite.

Mount Hope Cemetery in Rochester, N.Y., will be open until polls there close at 9 p.m. ET.

Although this presidential election is the first in American history to have a woman on the ballot as a major party candidate, it is not the first time people have commemorated their votes by visiting Anthony's grave.

When Estelle Schultz, 98, sealed her ballot for the 2016 election, she wanted to snap a photo to commemorate.

She sent it to her granddaughter Sarah Benor, who says she was moved to post the picture on Facebook. Like many posts during this election, it went viral.

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren ripped into Donald Trump on Hillary Clinton's behalf at a rally in New Hampshire on Monday. Warren was playing the role of a sassy friend with the snark to say the things Clinton either could or would not say.