tornadoes

Gail Banzet-Ellis / Oklahoma Tornado Project

This May marks the three-year anniversary of the EF-5 tornado that ripped through Joplin, Missouri, just across the northeastern Oklahoma border. As Gail Banzet-Ellis reports, the city, like Moore, Oklahoma, lost a hospital. The community’s health care facilities became symbols of overall recovery and revival.

Take Shelter Oklahoma / takeshelterok.org

For the past 9 months, school shelter supporters have fought to get a $500 million bond issue to fund safe room construction on a statewide ballot.  Attorney General Scott Pruitt revised the original proposal, adding what Take Shelter Oklahoma called "biased" and "unfair" language.  But as Kate Carlton Greer reports, the advocacy group announced a new version today. 

Jason Colston / American Red Cross

During tornado season, preparedness is key. Phrases like “Don’t be scared, be prepared” populate Twitter, Facebook and other social media sites when there’s a severe weather threat. One organization is now taking steps to ensure kids also know what to do when severe weather rolls in.  

Shannon Reed is a Community Resiliency Specialist with the Red Cross. Last month, she spent a day in a gymnasium at Carney Elementary School, teaching kids about severe weather.

After a devastating tornado rolled through Moore, Okla., last May, firefighters were scrambling to pull people out of storm shelters. Actually finding those shelters, though, was difficult. Landmarks had been swept away, and the town's emergency dispatcher was overwhelmed with calls.

"Yes, we're at 604 South Classen. There's people down," one caller said. "We're stuck under rubble. ... Please hurry."

Shonn Neidel was one of the firefighters rushing to rescue people that day, and he quickly saw a problem.

A devastating EF-5 tornado ripped through Moore, Okla., a year ago Tuesday. Just 11 days later, another twister ravaged the Oklahoma City metro area.

Nine of the 23 people who died as a result of the second storm were members of the local Latino community. Their deaths have sparked efforts to better prepare Hispanic families for storms.

On a windy afternoon in Oklahoma City, American Red Cross volunteer Ivelisse Cruz hands out stickers to families at the Children's Day Festival.

One year ago Tuesday, a violent tornado obliterated the city of Moore, Okla., killing 24 residents and leaving nearly 400 injured among the razed homes and businesses. It was the third violent tornado to strike the city in the past 15 years. But rather than move away, residents have stayed put in Moore — and more and more are actually moving here.

JenX: Remembering the Moore Tornado

May 20, 2014

Today marks one year since an EF5 tornado killed 25 people and devastated communities in southwest Oklahoma City and Moore.

Jennifer Lindsey McClintock has this remembrance in this week’s JenX.

Jennifer is an Oklahoma City native who works in marketing and public relations. You can reach her on twitter at @jeninthe405.

Kate Carlton / Oklahoma Tornado Project

One year ago this week, a deadly EF-5 tornado swept through Moore, Oklahoma, taking the lives of 24 people and destroying over 11-hundred homes. For many people, this week marks a painful reminder of the damage. For others, the year anniversary is an opportunity to put the devastation behind them with the support of their peers. Kate Carlton reports. 

New Store for Oklahoma Storm Season

May 16, 2014

A store dedicated to helping people prepare for emergencies opens just in time for the upcoming tornado season.

Located in Oklahoma City, the Homestand Preparation Station is the first of its kind with potential for more locations and partnerships in the future.

KOSU’s Maude Garrett reports the store goes beyond simply preparing for the next natural disaster.

Walking into Homestand Preparation Station the store is quiet, organized, and peaceful, the opposite of what you would experience after one of Oklahoma's infamous tornadoes.

Tanya Mattek

The month of May has a somber significance for many Oklahoma residents. It’s one of the busiest months for tornados, averaging 22 cyclones in 31 days. And after last year’s series of devastating storms that killed 25 people, it now also marks a sad anniversary. The Oklahoma Tornado Project and the Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center teamed up to remember the events that took place one year ago.

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