tornadoes

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The science behind tornado warnings has come a long way since the first one was issued 70 years ago. But typically about three-quarters of the time, when forecasters issue a warning, a tornado never actually happens. Some new research based on sound could help those warnings be more accurate.

After a tornado passes through a community, people talk about how the storm sounded, almost inevitably comparing the sound to that of a freight train.

Christian Kelly Large

Oklahoma’s 2018 tornado season has been fairly quiet when compared to years past, especially in 2013, when multiple large twisters permanently altered lives and landscapes during the month of May in the central part of our state

One of those storms, the gigantic El Reno tornado on May 31, 2013, was the widest ever recorded—2.6 miles—and its unpredictability stunned even the experts, claiming the lives of four seasoned storm chasers, as well as 17 others.

The StoryCorps mobile booth was in Oklahoma City in early 2018, and we're bringing you some of the stories that were recorded here. Locally recorded stories will air Wednesdays during Morning Edition and All Things Considered on KOSU.

It’s been five years since a second deadly EF-5 tornado struck Moore, Oklahoma. Vicki Hudoba lost her home in that tornado. She and her daughter Nicole Moore came to the Oklahoma City StoryCorps mobile booth to talk about that day in 2013 and how holding her infant grandson Luke held them together in the midst of devastation.

Authorities say shortly after a warning was issued Sunday morning, a tornado touched down in Breaux Bridge, La., flipping a mobile home and killing a mother and her 3-year-old daughter.

St. Martin Parish Sheriff's Office spokeswoman Maj. Ginny Higgins told The Associated Press that 38-year-old Francine Gotch and 3-year-old Nevaeh Alexander were pronounced dead at the scene.

A single tornado can cause a lot of damage. But even worse are tornado outbreaks. Just this week, a cluster of at least 18 tornadoes struck the Southeast over two days.

Scientists are seeing bigger clusters in recent years, and they're struggling to figure out what's happening.

There have been a number of weather-related deaths in Oklahoma since storms and flooding began on Friday, including a firefighter who died during a water rescue, and a 48-year-old woman who was killed after a tornado struck her home.

Nearly two years ago, a powerful tornado – the widest on record – struck the rural outskirts of Oklahoma City. Fortunately it missed heavily populated areas, but the ensuing flash flood killed 13 people in Oklahoma City, including nine Guatemalan immigrants.

Popular Mechanics recently talked with KFOR's Emily Sutton about bad movie science, the power of nature, and staring down an EF5 tornado.

Tornadoes in western Oklahoma damaged homes, brought down power lines and otherwise caused havoc Saturday evening, but no casualties have been reported.

Two years ago, one of the worst tornadoes on record hit the town of Moore, Okla. And you might say to yourself, well, doesn't this always happen there? It's called Tornado Alley for a reason.

And that's pretty much how the residents of Moore think about tornadoes. They're just part of life, and you take your chances. But that kind of thinking was part of the problem on May 20, 2013. The storm that came through that day was different. It was horrific.

A series of tornadoes in North Texas over the weekend have left at least one person dead and others missing. Meanwhile, in South Carolina, a weakening Tropical Storm Ana made landfall early this morning near Myrtle Beach, S.C.

One of the tornadoes that hit Saturday destroyed homes in a rural area south of Cisco, a town about 100 miles west of Fort Worth, Eastland County, Judge Rex Fields was quoted by The Associated Press as saying.

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