Tom Cole

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MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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ARUN RATH, HOST:

Here is a sampling of headlines for the morning of November 21, 2014:

  • Oklahoma’s Attorney General promises a lawsuit against the President’s immigration plan. (NewsOK)

  • The President’s immigration plan draws praise from some in northeast Oklahoma. (Tulsa World)

  • Controversy over the Pride of Oklahoma at OU results in a returning band director nearly doubling his pay. (Journal Record)

Republican U.S. Rep. Tom Cole is taking over as chairman of a powerful appropriations subcommittee in the U.S. House.

The seven-term congressman from Moore was named Thursday as chairman of the Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education.

The subcommittee has broad jurisdiction and oversees funding for several major agencies, including the Department of Education, Department of Health and Human Services and Department of Labor. This includes oversight of related agencies that deal with Medicaid, Medicare and Social Security.

Republicans in Congress are warning President Obama against acting alone on immigration, hours ahead of a planned announcement by the president that could provide temporary relief to some of the nearly 12 million immigrants in the country illegally.

Republicans say any unilateral action on immigration by the president would mean there is no chance of passing a comprehensive immigration overhaul in Congress.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Congress begins a five-week summer recess Saturday after a somewhat tumultuous exit.

The Republican-led House stuck around an extra day trying to overcome conservative opposition to an emergency spending bill dealing with the surge of under-age immigrants from Central America. While that chamber finally eked out a bill last night, it's likely going nowhere. The Senate had already left town after Republicans there blocked a similar funding effort.

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