Tom Cole

cole.house.gov

A bipartisan health care deal was introduced in the Senate. While there's a chance it could pass there, it faces a tougher time in the House. Rachel Martin talks to Rep. Tom Cole of Oklahoma.

cole.house.gov

House Republicans said they will consider restrictions on bump stock gun accessories. Steve Inskeep talks with Republican Rep. Tom Cole of Oklahoma about his position.

TRANSCRIPT:

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And let's hear the voice now. I have a Republican lawmaker. It's Congressman Tom Cole of the state of Oklahoma who's on the line with us. Congressman, thanks, as always, for joining us. We appreciate it.

TOM COLE: David, thank you.

Updated at 8:50 p.m. ET

President Trump is famous for requiring the loyalty of his subordinates. But it's the loyalty of Republican senators — not to him but to one of their own — that is the heart of a simmering showdown between the White House and Congress.

A growing number of GOP lawmakers appear to have had enough with what one has called the president's "public floggings" in recent days of Attorney General Jeff Sessions, a onetime senator from Alabama for served on Capitol Hill for two decades before joining the Trump administration.

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cole.house.gov

An Oklahoma congressman says he agrees with President Donald Trump’s decision to fire FBI Director James Comey.

Republican Rep. Tom Cole criticized Comey for his handling last summer of the investigation into Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton’s emails.

“No question in my mind James Comey’s an honorable person and has spent many, many years in public service. But he had become a lightning rod in a manner which was beginning to lead people to mistrust the FBI,” Cole said.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Oklahoma Congressman Tom Cole is on the line. He's a member of the House Republican leadership team. He's a deputy whip, which means his job is to help round up votes as Republicans are trying to do again today for a repeal and replacement of the Affordable Care Act.

Updated at 3:45 p.m. ET

Republicans finally got their health care bill.

After seven years of repeal-and-replace rhetoric against the Affordable Care Act, two presidential campaigns waged for and against it and a recent high-profile failure, House Republicans passed their bill.

The trouble is this bill is unlikely to ever become law — at least in its current iteration.

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To legally justify its military actions against the Islamic State, the U.S. has relied on a piece of 2001 legislation, written years before the extremist group came into existence.

Now 46 representatives from both parties say in a letter to Speaker Paul Ryan that it's time for Congress to "immediately begin a serious debate" on authorization for the use military force against the Islamic State.

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