Todd Lamb

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill about lawmakers resuming the second special session the day after starting the 2018 regular session, SoonerPoll releases results of a survey on the contenders for Governor in the primaries this June and another SoonerPoll showing unfavorable ratings for Governor Fallin and the State Legislature.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the Oklahoma Health Care Authority cutting Medicaid reimbursement rates 6% to most health care providers and 1% to nursing homes while the Attorney General, State Auditor and even the House of Representatives begin investigations of possible fiscal mismanagement at the Department of Health and lawmakers await an announcement on another special session to deal with the budget shortfall.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the announcement by University of Oklahoma President David Boren that he is stepping down from the job at the end of the school year, the state legislature gears up to start a special session to fix the budget on Monday and Senate President Pro Tem Mike Schulz says he is considering the position of executive director of the Oklahoma Farm Bureau.

This Week in Oklahoma, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about a controversy and lawsuit against the newest member of the State Supreme Court, Patrick Wyrick, over discrepancies on his application to the high court, Lieutenant Governor Todd Lamb announces he's retiring from the Governor's cabinet over a disagreement on extending the state's sales tax to services and Republican Senator Ralph Shortey gets an earful from participants in a town hall he held to talk about his bills which would make changes t

Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb is announcing his resignation from his position as Oklahoma's small business advocate on Gov. Mary Fallin's cabinet, citing a disagreement with Fallin over her plans to broaden the sales tax.

Lamb - who's considered a likely candidate for governor in 2018 - says he felt it was best to step aside from his cabinet post because he's unwilling to be an advocate for the tax proposals.

Ryan LaCroix / KOSU

Oklahoma’s Lieutenant Governor and prominent state business leaders are among those seeking to affect long term public policy through a newly formed foundation.

Lt. Governor Todd Lamb says E Foundation of Oklahoma seeks to create a more diversified economy, with the hope of insulating Oklahoma from a revenue failure like the one it now finds itself in.

Headlines for Wednesday, March 18, 2015:

  • An investigation of the County Commissioners Association leads to a shakeup in leadership. (Journal Record)
     
  • Oklahoma City’s Superintendent blames testing on high suspension rates among minorities. (NewsOK)

  • Members of the Muscogee Creek Nation file a petition to remove their chief. (Tulsa World)

This November, Oklahomans are deciding on the second in command for the executive branch of state government.

The Lieutenant Governor presides over the Senate when needed, but for the most part the position is designed to promote the state of Oklahoma.

KOSU’s Michael Cross reports neither candidate for Lieutenant Governor faced a primary opponent, so both are looking ahead to the general election.


In Oklahoma, a new law requires any woman seeking an abortion to first answer dozens of personal questions, including why she wants the procedure. That information, names omitted, would eventually be posted on a state Web site.

Those who support the measure say it will help them better understand why women are seeking abortions. Abortion rights advocates call the law intimidating and invasive, and this week, they are challenging it in court. Legal experts say the law is another test of how far states can go to regulate abortion.