Ten Commandments

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the announcement by University of Oklahoma President David Boren that he is stepping down from the job at the end of the school year, the state legislature gears up to start a special session to fix the budget on Monday and Senate President Pro Tem Mike Schulz says he is considering the position of executive director of the Oklahoma Farm Bureau.

Updated at 4:15 p.m. ET

Less than a day after a monument of the Ten Commandments was installed outside the Arkansas State Capitol in Little Rock, it was destroyed when a man smashed a car into the stone.

Authorities say Michael T. Reed II drove a 2016 Dodge Dart into the 6,000-pound granite slab at about 4:47 a.m. local time on Wednesday.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Poliical Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about State Question 790 to remove a section of the Oklahoma Constitution banning public funds for religious purposes, a Sooner Poll of all the state questions facing voters November 8th and a new report showing registered Republicans outnumbering Democrats in Oklahoma.

Ryan LaCroix / KOSU

Just over a year ago—under the dark of night—a Ten Commandments monument was removed from the state Capitol grounds.

Representative Mike Ritze paid for it. Governor Mary Fallin supported it. But its placement prompted a public debate—and ultimately a lawsuit—that forced its removal.

The Oklahoma Supreme Court ruled it had to come down and based their decision on a section of the Oklahoma Constitution—Article 2, Section 5—that says public money and property may not be used to benefit religion.

Ryan LaCroix / KOSU

Oklahoma voters will decide whether to abolish an article of the state Constitution so that a Ten Commandments monument can be returned to the Capitol grounds.

Ryan LaCroix / KOSU

Proposed constitutional amendments that ask voters to return a Ten Commandments monument to the Oklahoma Capitol grounds have been approved by separate House and Senate committees.

The Republican-backed measures were approved Wednesday by rules committees of the Oklahoma House and Senate and sent to the full chambers for a vote.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel anD Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill about the plan to use rainy day funds for supplemental appropriations to schools and prisons and the State Superintendent of Public Education Joy Hofmeister publicly questions bills to create Education Savings Accounts.

Ryan LaCroix / KOSU

A Republican-led effort to return a Ten Commandments monument to the Oklahoma Capitol grounds is one of several proposed ballot questions the state Senate has approved sending to voters.

The Oklahoma Senate approved three separate resolutions on Monday to send ballot measures to the voters.

Ryan LaCroix / KOSU

A court decision forcing the removal of a Ten Commandments monument from the statehouse grounds last year so angered Republican leaders in Oklahoma that several measures have been introduced in an effort to bring it back.

At least four resolutions seek a public vote on whether to amend the Oklahoma Constitution to remove the language that prohibits the use of public money or property from benefiting a religion.

Supporters of the resolutions say the monument's removal struck a nerve with Oklahomans who want to bring it back.

Ryan LaCroix / KOSU

On Wednesday, three House bills I'm keeping an eye on managed to get through committees. Here's a brief summary of what these bills entail and what happened:

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