State Capitol

Lawmakers managed to get all their work done one week before they were required to by the state constitution.

But, that doesn’t mean all the work is done for the year.

In this week’s 23rd and Lincoln, the Journal Record’s Marie Price explains most of the work over what is known as the Interim focuses on items they couldn’t get accomplished during the regular session.

You can find more of Marie’s insights on the capitol jrlr.net.

Governor Fallin vetoes legislation which would have allowed parents and educators decide on whether to hold back a 3rd grader who can’t read.

KOSU’s Michael Cross reports the Governor felt it gutted her signature Reading Sufficiency Act passed a few years ago.

Governor Fallin announced the veto of House Bill 2625 on Tuesday saying a third grader not being able to read affects all Oklahomans.

“We’ll see it in our unemployment numbers. We’ll see it in our adults that are trying to hold down just a minimum wage job. We’ll see it in our prisons.”

This Week in Oklahoma Politics KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the governor choosing to sign or veto a bill bringing parents and educators into the decision of reading retention for 3rd graders, concrete is falling into offices at the State Capitol, the governor approves a $13M supplemental for the Department of Corrections and the co-founder of the Sooner Tea Party creates a parody website poking fun at the senator he's accused of blackmailing.

  Governor Fallin wants to see more substantive work done in by State Representatives saying too many big problems are being ignored.

Fallin vetoed 15 House bills on Tuesday just to prove her point.

Fallin wants the State House to start focusing on what she calls substantive bills like prescription drug abuse, changing the pension system and a bond for capitol repairs.

To get the attention of Representatives she vetoed 15 bills she says are not relevant to the people of Oklahoma.

  The Oklahoma Department of Transportation is raising concerns about a bill heading to the full Senate to take money away from road and bridge projects.

An amended piece of legislation would move the money to common education.

An amendment to House Bill 2642 takes half of the nearly $60 million which would have gone every year to ODOT and gives it to Common Education.

ODOT Director Mike Patterson says while the lack of funding won’t impact work on structurally deficient bridges there are a couple of Oklahoma City projects which could see delays.

  More than 25,000 Oklahomans made their way to the Capitol on Monday to show support for Education.

The crowd included educators, parents, students and supporters from all corners of the state.

The chanting of more than 25,000 people fills the area south of the Capitol as the crowd stretches from the large steps past the dormant oil rig known as Petunia One and into the visitor parking lot.

Most of the attendees are wearing red to support education.

Dawna Watkins comes from Justus-Tiawah in Claremore.

The Satanic Temple / thesatanictemple.com

Recently, the Oklahoma State Capitol has become a major battleground in the debate over freedom of expression.  The placement of a Ten Commandments monument on the Capitol grounds has led to requests for statuary representation from other groups, including Hindus, the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals and the Satanic Temple.  The panel overseeing the Capitol grounds has stopped accepting these requests until an ACLU lawsuit regarding the Ten Commandments monument is settled, but the New York-based Satanic Temple is continuing with its plans.  It’s even submitted a design, which h