Right to Farm

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma voters on Tuesday soundly rejected State Question 777, a ballot measure that would have made farming and ranching a state constitutional right. The final tally was roughly 60 percent against and 40 percent in favor of the amendment — a difference of more than 290,000 votes.

Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma voters on Tuesday rejected State Question 777 — known by supporters as the right-to-farm amendment. The final vote was 60-40 against the measure, which would’ve elevated farming and ranching to a constitutional right.

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

When Oklahoma voters go to the polls next week, they’ll decide on State Question 777, known by supporters as the right-to-farm amendment. The measure would make farming and ranching a constitutional right and make it harder for the Legislature to enact laws that further regulate the agriculture industry.

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

State Question 777 would create a constitutional right to farm and ranch in Oklahoma, giving the agriculture industry unique protection from the state legislature. The ballot question concerns livestock and crops, but legal experts say the statewide measure will likely come down to lawsuits and courts.

In the weeks leading up to the November election, officials in cities and towns across the state have urged Oklahomans to vote no on SQ 777.

KOMUNEWS / Flickr

Oklahoma could become the third state to add a “right-to-farm” amendment to its constitution if voters approve State Question 777 this November. Voters in North Dakota and Missouri already adopted such a measure, but, the effects remain unclear there, even years after passage.

Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

State Question 777 — also known as ‘right-to-farm’ — would give agricultural producers in Oklahoma the constitutional right to raise livestock and grow crops without interference from future regulations by the state Legislature, without a compelling state interest.

Opposition to the state question comes from multiple sources, but a diverse coalition urging a ‘no’ vote is united by a shared concern: water.

This week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about State Question 777 known as "Right to Farm" by supporters and "Right to Harm" by opponents, the first presidential debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton and a new poll showing one in four Oklahomans supporting secession from the United States if Clinton wins in November.

facebook.com/votenoon777

Opponents of State Question 777 also known as "Right to Farm" on the November ballot are holding a rally Tuesday evening at the Tower Hotel in northwest Oklahoma City.

KOSU's Michael Cross spoke to Cynthia Archiniaco with the Oklahoma Stewardship Council about why she believes it's important to hold this event.

Former Oklahoma Governor David Walters and former OU football coach Barry Switzer are among those expected to attend the rally.

The Oklahoma City Council passed a resolution Tuesday formally opposing State Question 777, which is commonly known as the “right-to-farm” amendment. The proposal would add a new section to state law guaranteeing farmers and ranchers can operate without interference unless the state has a compelling reason to get involved.

Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma voters decide on State Question 777 in November. Supporters call the ballot initiative right-to-farm, but opponents prefer right-to-harm. It’s a divisive, national issue that’s made its way to Oklahoma, pitting agriculture against environmentalists and animal rights activists.

NASTY FIGHT

Pages