Oklahoma

Ice Storm Wreaks Havoc In Midwest, Plains

Jan 16, 2017

From Oklahoma to Kansas to Illinois, many towns are reeling from this weekend’s ice storm. The tiny town of Beaver, Oklahoma, had an inch of ice; many trees are downed and the town is without electricity.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson hears an update on the storm’s impact from Jon Elfers, the city’s fire chief and Beaver police officer Travis Snowden.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich signed a 20-week gestation limit for abortions into law Tuesday, while separately vetoing a measure that would have banned abortions after a fetal heartbeat is detectable.

The so-called heartbeat bill, which Kasich rejected, was considered more vulnerable to legal challenge. Provisions of the measure would have essentially limited the period during which women could get an abortion to about six weeks, when many women don't even realize they're pregnant, reports the Associated Press.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Copyright 2016 KQED Public Media. To see more, visit KQED Public Media.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

More than a year after Nebraska and Oklahoma sought to sue Colorado over the carry-over effects of that state's law making recreational marijuana legal, the U.S. Supreme Court has denied the two states' complaint.

The court did not explain its decision, with which Justices Samuel Alito and Clarence Thomas disagreed. Thomas wrote a five-page dissent in which Alito joined (a reminder: the court is currently at eight members).

Flickr / scubabrett22

The Supreme Court has rejected an effort by Nebraska and Oklahoma to have Colorado's pot legalization declared unconstitutional.

The justices are not commenting Monday in dismissing the lawsuit the states filed directly at the Supreme Court against their neighbor.

They argued that Colorado's law allowing recreational marijuana use by adults runs afoul of federal anti-drug laws. The states also said that legalized pot in Colorado is spilling across the borders into Nebraska and Oklahoma, complicating their anti-drug efforts and draining state resources.

Kevin Schiller had no idea what hit him.

With 21 years on the job, the building engineer for Macy's department stores had been in and out of every nook and cranny of many of the retail giant's Texas stores, including the storage room in the Macy's in Denton, Texas.

One minute, the stocky, 6-foot-2 Schiller was searching there for a floor drain. The next, he was sprawled on the floor, stunned, confused and bleeding slightly.

Flickr / scubabrett22

Oklahoma's attorney general says his state and others are suffering from the export of marijuana from Colorado and wants the U.S. Supreme Court to consider whether Colorado's pot market violates federal law.

Attorney General Scott Pruitt filed a brief Wednesday in the case in which Oklahoma and Nebraska want the nation's highest court to declare Colorado's pot legalization unconstitutional.

The Obama administration says the Supreme Court should reject a lawsuit from Nebraska and Oklahoma that seeks to declare Colorado's legalization of marijuana unconstitutional.

The Justice Department's top courtroom lawyer said in a brief filed Wednesday that the interstate dispute over a measure approved by Colorado voters in 2012 does not belong at the high court.

Nebraska and Oklahoma filed their lawsuit directly with the Supreme Court last year, arguing that Colorado's law allowing recreational marijuana use by adults runs afoul of federal anti-drug laws.

Pages