For 20 years, Robert Goldstein was NPR's music librarian. He went on to become a manager in our research and archives division, and shared his love of music with our audience in stories he wrote for broadcast and online. He was also an accomplished guitarist, whose work made an impression on a young Bob Boilen decades ago, sparking a friendship that continued when they began working together.

KT Tunstall On World Cafe

Oct 7, 2016

Originally from St. Andrews in Scotland, KT Tunstall became an overnight sensation in 2006 with her album Eye To The Telescope. But, like many overnight sensations, she'd been at it for more than a decade.

D∆WN's had a busy 2016, dropping three separate videos for "Not Above That," a fashion film for "Wake Up," a single for Adult Swim, a feature on Machinedrum's "Do It 4 U," and not to menti

The 2014 album The London Sessions wasn't so much a revitalization of Mary J. Blige's decades-long career as a way the R&B singer could reframe her music, with producers and songwriters attuned to her emotional and vocal range. Now Blige is back with Strength Of A Woman, due out this year on Capitol.

This is Sample Size, our weekly new music feature with KOSU's Ryan LaCroix and LOOKatOKC music critic Matt Carney.

Today, Matt plays new music from Hamilton Leithauser + Rostam, American Football, and LABRYS.

There are so many ways to be, so many ways to love and be loved. With last night's announcement of her long-awaited new album, Here, Alicia Keys offers a new song, "Blended Family (What You Do For Love)," featuring a verse from rapper A$AP Rocky. It's an acoustic guitar-driven song, decorated by cascading piano and a boom-bap beat, about starting a new family with a son from a previous marriage, mirroring Keys' own life.

Latin Roots: The Chamanas

Oct 6, 2016

World Cafe's latest Latin Roots segment features music and conversation with The Chamanas, a "frontereza" band from the border-spanning cities of El Paso, Texas, and Ciudad Juarez, Mexico. The members we talk to today, Manuel Calderon and Hector Carreon, are the band's founders, who recently brought on a new lead singer, Paulina Reza.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.


Dirty Projectors guitarist and singer Amber Coffman's long-anticipated solo album is finally about to see the light of day. It's called City Of No Reply, and the first single from it is a gorgeous, soulful — if slightly bent — ballad called "All To Myself." A video for the song shows Coffman strolling along the seaside, looking somewhat forlorn, while singing to herself. Later she's buried up to her neck in sand. "I've got to sing it out," Coffman sings. "Sing it all to myself, there's no one to run to.

What does a new album from The Rolling Stones sound like in 2016? If "Just A Fool" is any indication, it's a lot like the band's earliest recordings from more than 50 years ago. This cover of a Buddy Johnson and His Orchestra tune is the kind of harmonica-honked, barroom piano-plonked, dirty blues that introduced the world to the Stones, when the British band made a name for itself by interpreting American blues songs.