Muscogee Creek Nation

Muscogee (Creek) Nation

Oklahoma state attorneys warned of an ominous legal decision that could upend the jurisprudence around Native sovereignty in the United States.

“Oklahoma stands on the brink of the most radical jurisdictional shift since statehood,” state attorneys wrote in a Supreme Court brief filed last month. This week, the highest court agreed to hear the case in question, "Royal v. Murphy."

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday agreed to hear a case about Native American territory and a 1999 murder that could broadly affect tribal sovereignty and state legal authority.

Court Case Could Define Indian Country, Oklahoma

Feb 8, 2018
Library of Congress

This story was republished with permission from Mvskoke Media. Find more information at mvskokemedia.com.

One Muscogee (Creek) citizen’s court case might have the ability to affect not only the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, but the state of Oklahoma and Indian law as we know it.

The landmark case known as Murphy v. Royal will decide what court has the authority to try Patrick Murphy for committing murder within the Muscogee (Creek) Nation jurisdiction, but not on MCN-owned or trust land.

The Cleveland Indians will be removing "Chief Wahoo," the bright red caricature of a Native American the team uses as a logo, from players' caps and uniforms starting in 2019.

The divisive logo, which has been publicly protested as a racist and offensive image for decades, will remain on official merchandise available for purchase by fans.

"The team must maintain a retail presence so that MLB and the Indians can keep ownership of the trademark," The Associated Press reports.

Murder Conviction Overturned Based on MCN Jurisdiction Reach

Aug 15, 2017
okoffender.doc.ok.gov

This story was republished with permission from Mvskoke Media. Find more information at mvskokemedia.com.

The murder conviction of a Muscogee (Creek) citizen was overturned Aug. 8 in a federal court of appeals based on an argument that the crime was committed in Indian Country outside state jurisdiction.

Eli Grayson has always been fascinated with Creek history. His research led him to some surprising information about the Creek Nation, and his own family tree.

"I wish we had something in our DNA or in our brains that would allow us to go to sleep and call these people forth, and...actually hear their stories."

Watch his video below.

Allison Herrera

Long before the gushers of Glenpool, before any oil mansions dotted the tree-lined Arkansas River and before the automobile-ruled the streets of Tulsa, there were the Locv Pokv people, or as some know them- the Muscogee Creek. Locv Pokv was the daughter of the old town in the deep south of Georgia and Alabama, the Turtle Meeting Place.

Allison Herrera

Freedom of the press is something most journalists in the United States fiercely protect and demand. It’s seen as crucial to keeping those with power in check. But in Indian Country, it gets more complicated.

There are more than 200 tribal newspapers in the country and only a handful have passed freedom of the press acts. Editors have had stories cut, websites shut down and staff threatened or fired for publishing stories tribal officials don’t approve of.

Flickr / oakleyoriginals

Leaders of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation have plans to build a $22 million entertainment complex in suburban Tulsa.

Principal Chief George Tiger announced the project at a groundbreaking ceremony Wednesday. The new venue will be located at the Riverwalk Crossing in Jenks.