medical marijuana

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill about legislative leaders wanting to move quickly on revenue and policy proposals from civic and business leaders known as Step Up Oklahoma and the 2018 regular session begins on Monday with the Governor's State of the State Address.

The trio also discusses the resignation of Oklahoma City Public School Superintendent Aurora Lora and Congressman Tom Cole vying to become the next U.S. House Appropriations Chairman.

Flickr / scubabrett22

Voters will decide in June if Oklahoma will become the 30th state to legalize marijuana for medical use.

But, before voters cast their ballots on State Question 788, a bill could be pushed through the state legislature to put restrictions on medical marijuana, if it gets passed.

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Even three queasy pregnancies didn't prepare Kate Murphy for the nonstop nausea that often comes with chemotherapy.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and OKC Democratic Representative Forrest Bennett about a private-sector group known as Step Up Oklahoma introducing recommendations to the legislature to fix the budget as well as other policy issues and a new SoonerPoll shows 62% support for a medical marijuana state question going before voters this June.

The trio also discusses news of a GPS tracker getting attached to the truck of Moore Republican Representative Mark McBride.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the Governor's threat to veto any budget bill in the second special session which doesn't include a pay raise for teachers, the Oklahoma Education Association releases a poll showing support in Oklahoma for a teacher pay raise and the Oklahoma Independent Petroleum Association challenges the constitutionality of an initiative petition to increase taxes on oil and gas wells to fund education.

Jackie Fortier / StateImpact Oklahoma

On June 26, voters will decide if Oklahoma will become the 30th state to legalize marijuana for medical use. But regulating the new industry could prove difficult.

If State Question 788 passes, licenses will be required for each stage of marijuana cultivation, including dispensaries, commercial growers, processors, and individual medical marijuana cards.

Updated at 4:45 p.m. ET

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is scrapping Obama-era guidelines that essentially removed marijuana from the list of federal drug enforcement priorities as more states legalized it.

In guidance issued Thursday, Sessions rescinded those policies and instead will permit individual U.S. attorneys to decide how aggressively to go after marijuana in their jurisdictions.

Sessions, a former Alabama senator, has long viewed pot as a public menace and a source of street crime.

California native Malcolm Mirage's dream was to own a legal cannabis dispensary. For years, he had grown marijuana and sold it on the black market, while working a day job as a personal trainer. But in his late 20s, Mirage decided it was time to jump into the growing legal industry — before it got too crowded — and build his expertise into a sustainable, above-board business.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill about the Office of Management and Enterprise Services announcing it had taken $240M from the state's Rainy Day Fund to pay for operating expenses and the House heats up with a bill to provide a $34M supplemental appropriation to the Department of Human Services.

Doug Schwarz

The Oklahoma Supreme Court has rejected a proposed rewrite of a ballot question on medical marijuana that was submitted by the state Attorney General's office.

In a 7-1 ruling on Monday, the state's highest court rejected the proposed rewrite that supporters of the medical marijuana initiative had argued was intentionally misleading and could confuse people into thinking they were voting to fully legalize marijuana.

Under the ruling, the original ballot language drafted by the marijuana supporters will appear on the ballot.

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