medical devices

It's a club no one wants to join, but many Americans these days find themselves automatically eligible for the "Bill of the Month" club.

Kaiser Health News and NPR began collecting people's health care bills for examination early this year. We have waded through roughly 500 submissions, choosing just one each month to decode and dissect. (If you'd like to submit your story or bill, you can do it here.)

Sherry Young just wanted to be able to walk without pain.

About three years ago, she began to experience sharp pain in her left foot. Her big toe had become crooked and constantly rubbed up against the adjacent toe, making it painful to run, walk or even stand. "I could not walk without intense pain unless I had a pad underneath my toes for cushioning," Young said.

An orthopedic surgeon told her that he could fix her problem for good. "He thought my foot was hitting the ground too hard and causing pain," said Young. "That's what he was trying to correct."

U.S. manufacturers of medical devices started 2016 with a windfall — a two-year suspension of a controversial tax on their revenue.