Local News

The Two-Way
7:44 am
Wed May 14, 2014

Manning Could Move To Civilian Prison For Hormone Therapy

PVt. Chelsea Manning, formerly named Bradley, was convicted last year of sending classified documents to anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks. In this 2010 photo, Manning was dressed as a woman. The soldier has asked for hormone therapy and to be able to live as a woman.
U.S. Army handout Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 1:25 pm

The Pentagon is working on a prison transfer for convicted WikiLeaks source Pvt. Chelsea Manning, who has requested hormone therapy. The plan would allow Manning to serve time in a civilian prison, where such therapy is available.

Manning's first name was Bradley when the soldier made headlines for sending a trove of classified documents to the anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks.

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Oklahoma Tornado Project
7:38 am
Tue May 13, 2014

Documentary Shows Oklahomans Have Faith in Spite of Loss and Devastation

Credit WhereWasGod.com

For many victims of last year’s deadly tornadoes in central Oklahoma, the storms created an existential crisis, where people questioned their beliefs and wondered just what to make of all the destruction in their midst. Kate Carlton looks at one group’s effort to tackle life’s big questions through the lens of several storm survivors. 

“Where Was God” premieres at the Warren Theatre in Moore this Friday, May 16th.  You can buy tickets here.

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Uniquely Oklahoma
8:00 am
Mon May 12, 2014

OKC Craft Beer Week Events Celebrate Local Brewers

Credit @OKCCBW / Twitter

Local brewers and restaurants have a host of events planned nightly this week for Oklahoma City Craft Beer Week.  KOSU’s Nikole Robinson Carroll has details.

You can find out more about Oklahoma City Craft Beer Week on Twitter @OKCCBW and view the full schedule here. 

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Around the Nation
9:27 am
Fri May 9, 2014

Oklahoma Delays Next Execution For 6 Months

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 3:26 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

On a Friday, it's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

The state of Oklahoma now has at least six more months to get to know Charles Warner. He's a man who was scheduled to die, is sentenced for a brutal crime. But the state attorney general agreed to a stay of execution. That gives the state time to investigate the way it puts people to death. The investigation follows the execution of Clayton Lockett, a proceeding that took 43 minutes and intensified debate over the death penalty.

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Uniquely Oklahoma
8:56 am
Fri May 9, 2014

Oklahoma Private Investigator Everett McPhail: "Nothing like Magnum, P.I."

Private investigator Everett McPhail with Red-Handed Investigations, standing in KOSU's less-than-incognito studio.
Credit Nikole Robinson Carroll / KOSU

When you think of the term “private investigator,” what comes to mind?  Mystery?  Intrigue? Cheating spouses caught in the act?

One of KOSU’s own listeners, Everett McPhail, is a private investigator with Red-Handed Investigations.  KOSU’s Nikole Robinson Carroll spoke with him about the facts and fiction about being a gumshoe.

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Lethal Injection
6:01 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

The Messy Legal Road That Led To Oklahoma's Botched Execution

Republican Gov. Mary Fallin of Oklahoma, here with Michael C. Thompson, state secretary of safety and security, charged that the state Supreme Court had exceeded its jurisdiction when it called for a stay of execution in the Clayton Lockett case in March.
Alonzo Adams AP

Originally published on Thu May 8, 2014 11:08 pm

Although most of the country just became aware of issues with Oklahoma's capital punishment protocols last week after Clayton Lockett's bungled execution, his lawyers had been worried for months. That's because in January, two condemned men in different states but injected with the same new drug cocktail endured executions that went badly. Lockett's lawyer, Susanna Gattoni, was unable to keep him from suffering a similar fate last week.

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12:05 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

'Father of Lethal Injection' Talks About History, His Legacy to Oklahoma

The Tulsa World profiles Dr. Jay Chapman, Oklahoma's first chief medical examiner who invented the process of lethal injection.
The doctor who came up with the method talks about his legacy in Oklahoma and the U.S. Posted: Thursday, May 8, 2014 12:00 am | (%remaining%) Remaining Thanks for visiting the Tulsa World. You're entitled to view a limited number of free articles every 30 days.
1:56 pm
Tue May 6, 2014

A Botched Execution And The Death Penalty Now

On Point interviewed Ziva Branstetter of The Tulsa World on the botched execution in Oklahoma. The program also explores the future of capital punishment in America.
A Botched Execution And The Death Penalty Now The botched execution in Oklahoma. The President calls it 'deeply troubling.' The UN says a possible violation of international law. Guests Devlin Barrett , Justice Department reporter for The Wall Street Journal. (@DevlinBarrett) Peter Neufeld , co-director of the Innocence Project.
Real Pokes Pass it On
7:40 am
Tue May 6, 2014

Sustainability Program Benefits Women's Shelter

An Oklahoma State University organization is collecting donated items from students to sell for a discounted price next fall.

Students can donate clothing items, non-perishable food and furniture on campus through Thursday.

KOSU's Ashleigh Young reports proceeds raised go to a local battered women's shelter.  

U-Haul trailers are picking up donated items outside Kerr-Drummond Hall and the Griffith Center on the North side of Monroe from noon to 6:00 until Thursday night.

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Law
4:02 pm
Mon May 5, 2014

States Swap One Drug For Another, And Botched Executions Follow

Originally published on Mon May 5, 2014 6:35 pm

Oklahoma's botched execution of Clayton Lockett is prompting other states to question their use of the drug midazolam in lethal injections. The Lockett execution is fueling new calls to re-examine how states put inmates to death.

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