Leon Russell

Joseph Guay/Courtesy of the artist

When Leon Russell died last November, the 74-year-old star was recuperating from heart surgery and itching to get back out on the road. So it's no surprise that Russell — whose music fused soul, rock, gospel and country — left behind an impressive batch of songs that hadn't yet seen release. On Friday, 10 months after his death, On a Distant Shore continues a recorded legacy that hasn't dimmed.

In Memoriam 2016

Dec 19, 2016

Music suffered heavy losses in 2016, a year like no other in recent memory. We bid unexpected farewells to the very brightest stars — David Bowie and Prince — but we also lost masters from every corner of the music world, from classical composers and jazz greats to world music superstars, soul singers, country giants, prog-rock pioneers and record producers. They left us with unforgettable sounds and compelling stories. Hear their music and explore their legacies here.

(Credits: Tom Huizenga, producer; Mark Mobley, editor; Brittany Mayes, designer)

facebook.com/OKPOPmuseum

Officials say the planned $25 million Oklahoma Museum of Popular Culture will be built on donated land in downtown Tulsa.

The Oklahoma Historical Society announced Thursday that the new museum will be built on Main Street, across the street from the historic Cain's Ballroom. Officials say the vacant lot for the land, worth an estimated $1 million, was donated by David Sharp and Interak Corp.

Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Leon Russell has died in Nashville at the age of 74. His wife, Jan, said through an intermediary that the legendary musician and songwriter had passed away in his sleep in Nashville.

Russell "had heart bypass surgery in July and was recovering from that," his record company tells NPR in confirming Russell's death. The musician had been hoping to resume touring in January.

Middle America At The Dawn Of Outlaw Country

Apr 5, 2016

Early in Heads, his deep exploration of American psychedelic culture, Jesse Jarnow details how the Berkeley-based visual artist Rick Shubb drew up a peculiar new world map. Called "Humbead's Revised Map of the World" and appearing in underground magazines starting in 1968, it was a psychedelic Pangaea comprised primarily of hippie hubs like San Francisco, Cambridge and New York City.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

In the mid-1960s, pop music moved its center of gravity from New York to Los Angeles. It was a seismic shift, but growing up in the cold drizzle of post-World War II London, what did I know from the West Coast Sound? I was just a rapt kid with my ear glued to Top-40 radio, dreaming of sun, surf and sex via the Beach Boys, the Mamas and Papas, Sam Cooke, The Supremes. In my fevered imagination, Spector's towering "wall of sound" had to have been recorded in a cathedral.

OklahomaRock.com published a "catch-up" of Oklahoma music news of the past few weeks from Red City Radio, John Fullbright, Leon Russell, Wrathschild, Jabee, Lizard Police, Crystal Vision, Horse Thief, and much more.