Jim Inhofe

Former Vice President Al Gore helped shape the conversation about climate change with An Inconvenient Truth. Now he's back with a sequel — called An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power, due out next month -- and it follows Gore as he continues the crusade he made famous with that first film.

The movie shows Gore standing in Miami floodwater, flying over imploding boulders of ice in Greenland and in Paris — trying to push the climate agreement over the finish line.

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

A cornerstone of President Trump’s campaign and presidency is a $1 trillion proposal to rebuild U.S. infrastructure. The promise is a popular one, and could find bipartisan support across the country and in Congress. The infrastructure needs in Oklahoma illustrate why this issue is so appealing — and challenging.

President Trump announced Thursday that the U.S. will leave the Paris climate deal.

Here are five things that could be affected by the decision.

1. The coal industry

Even coal companies had lobbied the Trump administration to stay in the agreement.

President Trump will tell the world Thursday whether he plans to keep the U.S. in the Paris Agreement on climate change.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Oklahoma Republican Sen. James Inhofe (@JimInhofe), one of the deal’s most vocal critics in Congress.

Updated at 5:45 p.m. ET

President Trump has announced that the U.S. will be withdrawing from the Paris accord — the historic global agreement reached by 195 countries in 2015 to set targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and limiting the rise in average global temperatures.

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Speaking at a media event atop an interstate overpass construction site in Norman, U.S. Senator Jim Inhofe told a small crowd Friday that President Donald Trump is serious about a proposed $1 trillion national infrastructure plan.

The Republican is chair of a Senate subcommittee that oversees such programs and he said Oklahoma stands to benefit from a new focus for federal funding.

U.S. lawmakers are divided on President Trump’s decision to retaliate against the Syrian government after its apparent use of chemical weapons.

With a vote scheduled for Thursday in the U.S. House, it's down to the wire for the American Health Care Act, the Republican-authored bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

Oklahoma U.S. Senator Jim Inhofe penned an opinion piece for USA Today this week, supporting President Donald Trump's ending some environmental regulations.

twitter.com/SenatorLankford

U.S. Sen. Jim Inhofe says damage from a wildfire that scorched hundreds of square miles in northwestern Oklahoma is "unprecedented."

Oklahoma's senior U.S. senator and fellow U.S. Sen. James Lankford of Oklahoma spoke to farmers and ranchers in Woodward Friday after visiting some of the fire-damaged areas.

Inhofe says he flew over portions of the region to get an idea of the enormity of damage along the Oklahoma-Kansas border. Inhofe says he's visited other disaster areas but has never seen anything like the wildfire damage in northwestern Oklahoma.

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