Jim Inhofe

The oddest of Senate odd couples — California Democrat Barbara Boxer and Oklahoma Republican Jim Inhofe — have accomplished something highly unusual in this bitter election year: significant, bipartisan legislation on the environment that has become law.

Boxer, a staunch liberal, calls climate change the "greatest challenge to hit the planet," battles against offshore drilling, rails about the dangers of nuclear power and has pushed to restrict greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to global warming.

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A Republican senator is trying to relax the medical requirements for private pilots who fly small planes.

And that effort by Sen. James Inhofe of Oklahoma is drawing complaints from Democrats who say he's going back on a compromise that became law only two months ago.

Inhofe is an avid, 81-year-old pilot who's had a quadruple heart bypass. He's trying to eliminate a requirement that pilots have a statement from their doctor saying they don't have a medical condition that would interfere with their ability to safely operate a plane.

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Oklahoma officials and the Choctaw and Chickasaw Nations spent 5 years hammering out a deal to share control of water across southeast Oklahoma, but coming to an agreement isn’t the end of the process. A fickle U.S. Congress still has to give its approval.

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U.S. Sen. Jim Inhofe walked away from the forced landing of his small plane amid severe weekend weather - the latest of several troubled landings for the avid pilot, who at 81 shows no signs of leaving the cockpit.

The Republican senator brought his plane down in Ketchum, a small community in far northeastern Oklahoma, spokeswoman Donelle Harder said Monday.

There is no maximum age for pilots - some fly well into their 90s, said Lynn Lunsford, a spokesman for the Federal Aviation Administration.

House and Senate negotiators have agreed on a plan to update a 40-year-old law regulating the safety of chemicals.

Federal appeals court judge Merrick Garland headed to Capitol Hill Thursday afternoon to meet with senators, beginning the traditional ritual of any nominee to the Supreme Court.

But for the former prosecutor, the exercise could be in vain. Senate Republicans are holding steadfast in their refusal to even consider Garland's nomination to succeed the late Justice Antonin Scalia, who died unexpectedly last month.

Even though the thought of Donald Trump at the top of the ticket is making a lot of Republicans in Congress queasy, they're not exactly flocking to the guy in second place to save them — Ted Cruz. Cruz did not have a single endorsement from any of his Senate colleagues, until this week when Republican Sen. Mike Lee of Utah committed his support. Marco Rubio, on the other hand, has landed 14 Senate endorsements.

That's because the bad blood between Cruz and his colleagues runs so deep.

It's Getting Awkward

Six of Oklahoma's seven-member congressional delegation voted for a budget plan that passed both the House and Senate and heads to the president.

he measure passed the Senate on a 65-33 vote Friday after passing the House by a 316-113 margin earlier in the day. It combines $1.14 trillion in new spending and $680 billion in tax cuts over the coming decade.

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report from the non-partisan Government Accountability Office concludes the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s social media push for support of its “Waters of the United States” rule broke federal law and amounts to “covert propaganda.”

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