Jim Inhofe

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U.S. Sen. Jim Inhofe walked away from the forced landing of his small plane amid severe weekend weather - the latest of several troubled landings for the avid pilot, who at 81 shows no signs of leaving the cockpit.

The Republican senator brought his plane down in Ketchum, a small community in far northeastern Oklahoma, spokeswoman Donelle Harder said Monday.

There is no maximum age for pilots - some fly well into their 90s, said Lynn Lunsford, a spokesman for the Federal Aviation Administration.

House and Senate negotiators have agreed on a plan to update a 40-year-old law regulating the safety of chemicals.

Federal appeals court judge Merrick Garland headed to Capitol Hill Thursday afternoon to meet with senators, beginning the traditional ritual of any nominee to the Supreme Court.

But for the former prosecutor, the exercise could be in vain. Senate Republicans are holding steadfast in their refusal to even consider Garland's nomination to succeed the late Justice Antonin Scalia, who died unexpectedly last month.

Even though the thought of Donald Trump at the top of the ticket is making a lot of Republicans in Congress queasy, they're not exactly flocking to the guy in second place to save them — Ted Cruz. Cruz did not have a single endorsement from any of his Senate colleagues, until this week when Republican Sen. Mike Lee of Utah committed his support. Marco Rubio, on the other hand, has landed 14 Senate endorsements.

That's because the bad blood between Cruz and his colleagues runs so deep.

It's Getting Awkward

Six of Oklahoma's seven-member congressional delegation voted for a budget plan that passed both the House and Senate and heads to the president.

he measure passed the Senate on a 65-33 vote Friday after passing the House by a 316-113 margin earlier in the day. It combines $1.14 trillion in new spending and $680 billion in tax cuts over the coming decade.

Flickr / Chesapeake Bay Program

report from the non-partisan Government Accountability Office concludes the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s social media push for support of its “Waters of the United States” rule broke federal law and amounts to “covert propaganda.”

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President Obama and delegates from nearly 200 nations are gathering in Paris to hammer out an agreement to rein in global climate change

World leaders are acknowledging their countries’ contributions to climate change, and are making commitments to improve the environment. But there’s an army of Republicans pushing against Obama’s Paris plan, and U.S. Sen. Jim Inhofe of Oklahoma is one of its generals.

The United States and 19 other countries on Monday promised to work toward doubling their spending over five years to support "clean energy" research.

At the same time, 28 private investors, including Microsoft's Bill Gates, Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg and Amazon's Jeff Bezos, pledged their own money to help build private businesses based on that public research.

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The Obama Administration recently announced stricter limits on ground-level ozone, a smog-causing pollutant closely monitored by environmentalists and the fossil fuel industry.

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