James Lankford

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

U.S. Sen. James Lankford is introducing a bill to remove an expired wind energy incentive from the federal tax code.

The federal Production Tax Credit for wind energy expired in December 2014, but since it’s part of the tax code, lawmakers can extend it by bundling it with legislation to extend other tax credits and incentives. That has happened as recently as July, when a Senate committee voted to extend the PTC as part of a $95 billion bundle of incentives.

Senator James Lankford / Facebook

U.S. Sen. James Lankford told business leaders in downtown Oklahoma City Thursday the country is going through a debate right now over whether it wants to governed by Washington, or the states.

“Will this be a nation that has a group of technocrats that are pretty smart people – there are some pretty smart folks in D.C. – that will really decide the policy for the nation?” Lankford asked. “Or will this be a nation that decisions are made close to the people that are affected by that decision?”

The uproar over sting videos alleging Planned Parenthood illegally profits from selling aborted fetal tissue has only just begun on Capitol Hill.

Updated July 30, 12:01 p.m.

Republican U.S. Senators discussed legislation Wednesday that would block federal money from going to Planned Parenthood and send those funds to other organizations that provide healthcare services for women.

The Atlantic hurricane season starts next month — a time when coastal states have their disaster plans at the ready. Now, the federal government wants states to consider the potential effects of climate change in those blueprints.

States lay out strategies for reducing harm from a whole host of calamities that might strike, such as hurricanes, earthquakes, floods, or drought.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency, FEMA, gives states money to mitigate those risks — grants that might help pay for tornado safe rooms, or to elevate buildings in a flood zone, for instance.

Headlines for Friday, April 3, 2015:

  • Governor Fallin signs a bill banning payroll deductions for dues to teachers unions. (Tulsa World)

  • Another energy company announces layoffs. (Journal Record)

  • The deaths of four people in Tulsa leave the community perplexed. (KJRH)

Headlines for Friday, March 13, 2015:

  • OU President David Boren calls for an inquiry into the officers at a now disbanded fraternity. (NewsOK)

  • OSU Student with same name as the Sigma Alpha Epsilon student leading a racist chant on video gets harassment online. (KERA)

  • High profile Enid attorney Stephen Jones is representing SAE in possible lawsuit against OU (KFOR)

Starting tomorrow during early voting, Oklahomans in Congressional District Five are deciding on their fourth Congressman in eight years.

The Democrat and Republican in the general election are each veterans and small businessmen who served in the State Senate.

Former State Senator Steve Russell is meeting with constituents at his headquarters in Oklahoma City.

Russell retired from the U-S Army as a Lieutenant Colonel and even wrote a book about his experiences called, “We Got Him: A Memoir of the Hunt and Capture of Saddam Hussein.”

For the first time since statehood, voters are picking both of the US Senate seats to represent Oklahoma in Washington, DC.

We already knew incumbent Jim Inhofe was going to seek reelection, but things got exciting a year ago when Tom Coburn decided to retire with two years left on his term.

KOSU’s Michael Cross reports this opened a seat, many didn’t expect until 2016.

When Dr. Coburn announced plans to step down from his Senate position, the race to fill it began.

By April, seven Republicans, three Democrats and an Independent filed to run.

In This Week in Oklahoma Poltics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel and Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill about the move by the U.S. Supreme Court which allowed for same sex marriages in Oklahoma.