immigration

Parallels
12:07 pm
Fri September 12, 2014

Mexican Crackdown Slows Central American Immigration To U.S.

Migrants at a shelter in southern Mexico say that Mexico's interior checkpoints are making it harder to travel north. Some have given up on reaching the U.S. and are trying to stay in Mexico.
Carrie Kahn NPR

Originally published on Fri September 12, 2014 6:32 pm

The number of Central Americans reaching the U.S. border has dropped dramatically. According to the U.S. Border Patrol, 60 percent fewer unaccompanied minors were apprehended in August than at the height of the migration crisis earlier this summer.

One factor leading to the drastic decline is an unprecedented crackdown in Mexico. Under pressure from the United States, Mexico has begun arresting and deporting tens of thousands of Central Americans long before they reach the U.S. border.

Stepped-Up Deportations

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Parallels
5:27 pm
Sun September 7, 2014

U.S. Border Patrol Apprehending Fewer Central Americans

A man looks out towards the US from the Mexican side of the border fence that divides the two countries in San Diego. The U.S. Border Patrol says it has seen about a 60 percent drop in the number of Central Americans apprehended at the border.
Mark Ralston AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun September 7, 2014 9:51 pm

The number of Central American children and families being apprehended at the U.S.-Mexican border has dropped dramatically in recent months, according to the U.S. Border Patrol. There has been a 60 percent decline in apprehensions of minors since the record numbers making the illegal trek earlier this summer.

A lot of factors may be contributing to the dramatic drop, including heavy rains along the migrant route and media campaigns in home countries dispelling rumors that kids can stay in the U.S.

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Politics
7:28 pm
Thu August 28, 2014

Obama Weighs Possible Immigration Orders — And Their Political Ripples

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Law
3:47 am
Thu August 28, 2014

Former Border Protection Insider Alleges Corruption, Distortion In Agency

James Tomsheck poses in his office in Washington in June 2009. At the time, he was assistant commissioner for internal affairs with U.S. Customs and Border Protection.
Alex Brandon AP

Originally published on Thu August 28, 2014 8:53 am

Two months ago, James Tomsheck was pushed out of his job as internal affairs chief for U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

At the time, authorities criticized him for not doing enough to investigate abuse and corruption.

But now Tomsheck tells a very different story: about a culture that goes out of its way to evade legal restraints.

Use of force by law enforcement agents along the Southwest border has drawn attention and criticism recently, after reports that Border Patrol agents shot and killed unarmed migrants and faced no consequences.

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Around the Nation
3:49 am
Mon August 18, 2014

In South Texas, Few On The Fence Over Divisive Border Wall Issue

Pamela Taylor, who lives near Brownsville, Texas, calls the border fence there "useless."
John Burnett NPR

Originally published on Mon August 25, 2014 10:36 am

When Congress thinks about border security, it often sees a big, imposing fence.

The federal government has spent $2.3 billion to build the fence — 649 miles of steel fencing, in sections, between the U.S. and Mexico, designed to help control the illegal movement of people and contraband.

It's called tactical infrastructure, and the Border Patrol says it works. But people on the lower Texas border have another name for it: a boondoggle.

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Law
4:30 am
Thu August 14, 2014

Young Migrants May Request Asylum, But It's Hard To Get

Immigration and Customs officials stand by as a woman and child, who were deported from the United States, deplane at the San Pedro Sula airport in Honduras on July 18.
Esteban Felix AP

Originally published on Thu August 14, 2014 8:01 am

The recent surge of young migrants from Central America means immigration judges across the U.S. are deciding who can stay — and who must go back home.

But amid the emotional debate surrounding the issue, what exactly is the law when it comes to immigration and asylum seekers?

Maria Cristina Garcia, a professor of immigration and refugee history at Cornell University, spoke with Morning Edition's Steve Inskeep about the law that's likely to be applied in these cases.

How does one become eligible for asylum in the U.S.?

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Law
7:42 am
Tue August 12, 2014

Migrants Jam LA Courtroom For Deportation Hearing

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Local News
4:44 pm
Mon August 11, 2014

Unaccompanied Minor Children Leave Fort Sill Temporary Facility

Rep. Jim Bridenstine trying to gain access to HHS housing facility at Ft. Sill, Oklahoma on July 1, 2014.
Credit bridenstine.house.gov

A spokesman for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services says more than 1,800 unaccompanied minor children were processed through Fort Sill in southwestern Oklahoma before the facility was closed last week.

Spokesman Kenneth Wolfe for HHS' Administration for Children and Families says 1,861 minors were processed through Fort Sill. The temporary shelter opened in June and its operations were closed last Wednesday.

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Politics
4:44 pm
Mon August 11, 2014

Two Ways President Obama Could Act On Immigration

Immigration advocates from Fort Lauderdale, Florida demonstrate outside the White House in April 2014.
AP

Originally published on Mon August 11, 2014 8:51 pm

Sometime before the end of summer, President Obama is expected to take executive action to address the nation's broken immigration system.

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Law
4:14 pm
Mon August 11, 2014

Strapped And Stretched, Non-Profits Struggle To Defend Immigrant Minors

Originally published on Mon August 11, 2014 8:51 pm

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